Urban Caches – an experience

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    • #63003
      Daniel
      Participant

        Hello All,

        My area is urban/suburban (I know…) and the place is going downhill fast and has been for some time. That means lots of large, empty, neglected buildings sitting around. Our story involves the building that once housed the city’s first high school. Photo attached below. It’s well over 100 years old, easily covers a city block and goes four stories up, has a full basement and numerous deeper sub-basements, one of which holds the original swimming pool. As you can see there are many ways in and out and the old school designs were more maze than efficient – easy to get turned around if you don’t know your way. It hasn’t been maintained in a decade or more so the leaking roof has the place full of mold. It hits you hard ten steps in and gets worse the deeper you go. Plus there’s the asbestos if you’re not careful. A respirator mask is a must for more than a minute or two. That means no squatters, homeless, vandals or other neer-do-wells wandering around. Once inside you have the place completely to yourself in a silent time capsule. Conditions make it a terrible hangout but a good place to hide things. Off the pool area is a small compartment giving access to heavy piping with plenty of room for a couple of full duffle bags. Keep in mind this is below a sub-basement and air quality way down here is both *really* bad but not nearly as moldy for some reason. Did I mention pitch black?

        Stuff stashed. What could possibly go wrong? Heh – find out next post…

      • #63004
        Daniel
        Participant

          What could go wrong? Well, they could get around to demoing the building. See the photo. The pool area was under the left side of the remaining rubble. Lesson here? Keep up with urban renewal plans that might impact where you might have left stuff. For starters…

        • #63005
          Corvette
          Participant

            Uh Oh, lol

            Sorry for your bad luck.
            I had a feeling it was no longer a perfect spot or you would not have revealed it.

            The conditions you described are among the few I would recommend using military surplus protective mask for…

          • #63006
            Former Sapper
            Participant

              Thats fucking shit luck. I know and spoke to a few urban explorers who used to revel in going in to shitty buildings like that, had the full mask set up, gas alarms, the whole nine yards (they sometimes post on the 28dayslater forum). Interesting though, I’ve never given any thought to an urban cache… something to consider.

            • #63007
              Max
              Keymaster

                Only carrying 210 rounds on your load? Need to carry more? (honestly should be another “combat load” in you pack)

                Good planning around a mobile defense can allow you to have all the ammo you will ever need, if you plan a mobile defense correctly with appropriately placed caches… So you stored up 20,000 rounds. It’s a bad idea and highly ineffective to have it all in one place.

              • #63008
                Daniel
                Participant

                  At least I’m one step closer to my lifetime achievement “That Guy” tab. ;)

                • #63009
                  Roadkill
                  Participant

                    A word of caution. Some areas that look good but smell bad or have no smell can be deadly. In my Haz mat training we were shown scenarios that I would never have considered dangerous. A six foot open top steel tank with rust from the dew of an evening killed three guys who were going in to clean it. The rust depleted the oxygen, since rust is a form of combustion it used up the oxygen in the tank, even though the tank was open top. Other dangers can be plant life depleting theO2. You would need an scba to enter these environments not just a personal respirator. Some of these great hiding spots are considered confined spaces and require extensive training. I would say enter at great risk.

                  • #63010
                    Former Sapper
                    Participant

                      A word of caution. Some areas that look good but smell bad or have no smell can be deadly. In my Haz mat training we were shown scenarios that I would never have considered dangerous. A six foot open top steel tank with rust from the dew of an evening killed three guys who were going in to clean it. The rust depleted the oxygen, since rust is a form of combustion it used up the oxygen in the tank, even though the tank was open top. Other dangers can be plant life depleting theO2. You would need an scba to enter these environments not just a personal respirator. Some of these great hiding spots are considered confined spaces and require extensive training. I would say enter at great risk.

                      That pretty much mirrors what the lads from the previously mentioned forum pretty much said to me too, especially in places full of rotted building material and biological waste. They carried with them a “4 gas meter” type alarm thing, respirator and in some cases scuba gear. Same applied for cabling people who worked as a seperate division of a company I used to work for.

                      I do wonder if there is a happy medium to be found between shady/sketchy etc (in the discouraging people from exploring sense) and a safe secure location.

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