The Falklands War

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  • This topic has 8 replies, 5 voices, and was last updated 3 years, 4 months ago by Max. This post has been viewed 21 times
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    • #84853
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        I post this for its historical significance and to help dispel some of ignorance; particularly here in the US, regarding the Falklands War.

        Many think of it as similar to our “Operation Urgent Fury” in Grenada, this couldn’t be further from the truth.

        This documentary provides a reasonable account from both sides perspectives.

      • #84854
        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
        Moderator

          A little known mission by even those in the UK (public short term memory) the RAF launched a Vulcan bomber 8,000-miles to put the runway at Port Stanley out of action.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2Yl8ntVS-4

        • #84855
          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
          Moderator

            Finally the important role of Special Air Service and Special Boat Service.

          • #84856
            Corvette
            Participant

              Not to take anything away from what the British Forces did, under very difficult circumstances they did much better than I think we could have, but everything I’ve read about that war reminds me of the quote, attributed to Wellington. “It was a near run thing!” In other words it could have gone south on them badly. Still some brilliant soldiering all the same.

            • #84857
              hellokitty
              Participant

                Max Hastings authored a pretty good history of this conflict.

                HEAT 1(CTT) X 3
                HEAT 2 (CP) X1
                FOF X3
                OPFOR X2
                CLC X2
                RIFLEMAN

              • #84858
                trailman
                Participant

                  A little known mission by even those in the UK (public short term memory) the RAF launched a Vulcan bomber 8,000-miles to put the runway at Port Stanley out of action.

                  <iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/X2Yl8ntVS-4?feature=oembed&#8221; allowfullscreen=”” height=”321″ frameborder=”0″ width=”570″></iframe>

                  I watched that a while back, a modern day Doolittle raid. :good:

                • #84859
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    In other words it could have gone south on them badly.

                    I suspect that this is more common than most would admit.

                  • #84860
                    Corvette
                    Participant

                      Just going by photos I’ve seen of the Brits in the Falklands and the terrain there, it sort of reminds me of pictures I”ve seen of British troops in training areas in Britain, maybe just colder. Perhaps Max or any British readers could tell us?

                    • #84861
                      Max
                      Keymaster

                        When I was in the Paras, the senior NCOs were the Falklands vets. So it was a mix of Falklands and Northern Ireland experience in the early 90s.

                        When I was OC 2 PARA anti-tanks, my color sergeant had been at Goose Green. He described being pinned down in one to the shallow reentrants (draws) as they were trying to assult the dug in Argie positions. It was daylight by then, the attack being stalled and around that time to CO, ‘H’ Jones, had been killed. He described a young officer, who was carrying a radio, sat on the upper part of the draw where he was observed by the enemy positions. He would, every now and then, take a round into the radio on his back, rocking slumped over with the inpact.

                        Yes, the Falklands is kind of similar to many of the training areas in the UK. Some formations such as the Paras and Marines did well, because they were used to it. Others did not. This was a big factor in the Welsh Guards, who had been on ceremonial duties for the Queen, not dismounting from thr Sir Galahad ship, which was hit by an enemy aircraft causing horrific casaultirs.

                        As usual equipment was an issue, with the ankle high ‘DMS’ boot leading to a lot of trench foot problems. 3 PARA attacked up Mount Longdon against an enemy much beeter equipped witj night vision.

                        As a result of this war, Para Selection was amended with the addition of a couple of much longer endurance marches, including an 18 miler. Previously, the 10 miler had been added as a result of the drop zone at Arnhem being 10 miles from the Bridge.

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