SOFTT-W vs SOFTT?

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    • #109424
      Daniel
      Participant

        I decided to add the SOFTT to my kit and see they also have a wide version. Any reason to go one way over the other?

        Regular: http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/item/05149/s-tourniquets/-SOFT-Tourniquet-(SOFTT)

        Wide: http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/item/05189/s-tourniquets/-SOFTT-W-Tourniquet

      • #109425
        Max
        Keymaster

          W version.

        • #109426
          Daniel
          Participant

            Thank you kindly.

          • #109427
            Robert
            Participant

              The new clip together thing is very handy.

              The older version with the thumbscrew deal is crappola.

            • #109428
              HiDesertRat
              Participant

                What about between SOFT-W vs C-A-T ?

              • #109429
                TC
                Participant

                  What about between SOFT-W vs C-A-T ?

                  SOFTT-W because it is reusable. The CAT is single use, which is why it comes in a blue trainer version. SOFTT has a windlass made of aluminum instead of plastic, so it’s stronger and won’t degrade under UV exposure. And it folds flatter if you use the method shown in this video.

                • #109430
                  hellokitty
                  Participant

                    CAT is easier to apply than the SOFTT one handed IMO which I believe is a common complaint. Non are perfect all work.

                    HEAT 1(CTT) X 3
                    HEAT 2 (CP) X1
                    FOF X3
                    OPFOR X2
                    CLC X2
                    RIFLEMAN

                  • #109431
                    HiDesertRat
                    Participant

                      Thanks. Only have practiced only with the C-A-T. Ability to use one handed is very important for self care. Durability is certainly important factor as well.

                    • #109432
                      wheelsee
                      Participant

                        5 year-old article but here’s one reason for wide

                        http://www.emsworld.com/article/10364651/ems-recap-tourniquets

                      • #109433
                        wheelsee
                        Participant

                          This one is from the Journal of Special Operations Medicine, Winter 2015

                          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26630093

                        • #109434
                          Max
                          Keymaster

                            I owe a better explanation than my one word answer:

                            The SOFTT-W is actually easier to apply than a CAT. If you leave it clipped up, it can easily be applied one handed, and the web material is easier to pull through the buckle than with a CAT, which is impeded by the velcro and a shitty plastic buckle. To out the CAT around a leg, ‘lassoing’ is not allowed, so you have to undo it form the buckle then pass it through the buckle again, which is a pan under stress. The SOFTT-W has a convenient clip which you juts attach once you have it around the limb, and then it easily tightens, not impeded by that damn velcro again.

                            The original question is about width. You want the wider 1.5 – 2″ strap. This is because it s preferable to use a wide strap then a thin one,. You would not use 550 cord as a TQ, but you would use a belt, for example. The reason is muscle damage: a wider belt will compress the artery without damaging the muscle as it does so.

                            Think about what we are doing here: we are using the TQ to constrict the artery, in the thigh or upper arm, against the long bone. That is all. This is why it is no longer taught in TC3 to put the TQ 2-3″ inches above the wound. For a thinking medic, that may still be done as an option to reduce/replace the original ‘high and tight’ TQ in order to try and reduce/prevent limb damage if definitive care is not available (as well as reducing the TQ completely to combat gauze / dressing if it will hold the clot). If you think about a TQ on a lower limb, perhaps after a traumatic amputation, then you have 2 bones there and the run of the main artery is not so easy to compress against one of them. You may end up also just mashing the two broken bones. This is why ‘high and tight’ is taught, and also why we use a wider TQ strap, to compress without damaging the surrounding muscles.

                            In addition: I know the crap you guys all read on the interwebz, such as shite reposted by WRSA. Don’t listen to that brushbeater guy. As a com-meter said, he is way out of his lane with his TC3 post. Same about the mob scenario. Going to that post to comment now.

                          • #109435
                            Daniel
                            Participant

                              Yes, I did ask this at Brushbeater’s place before I thought to bring it here. Duh. No help there…

                            • #109436
                              Max
                              Keymaster

                                Really? You are actually reading his site? But you are a member here? Wow.

                              • #109437
                                Daniel
                                Participant

                                  Hence the “duh”…

                                • #109438
                                  Eddie
                                  Participant

                                    25 year Civilian FF/Paramedic here. Also had the honor of working with / training 18-Deltas during their civilian ride alongs.

                                    My personal choice. SOFT-W then SOFT then CAT. I have all 3, and they all work. I have used the W & Cat when it mattered and all worked perfectly. Wider will produce less risk of cellular damage at the area of application.

                                    What I learned from 18-D’s. Same order of preference. Cat’s have been reported to snap the windlass in training. Unknown to me if ever in real life.

                                    NONE are intended to be reused.

                                    The 3 above are the ONLY ones(under $100) that I would buy. The stretchy things are NOT tourniquets, they’re restricting bands.

                                  • #109439
                                    JustARandomGuy
                                    Participant

                                      Per CAT TQ issues;

                                      Some of the reported CAT failures may be due to UV degradation, given current theaters… I remember a fellow that had been to pick-a-stan a time or two, and IIRC, stated that standard procedure for TQs was to replace every month[?] due to UV deterioration- more specifically for TQs worn exposed, such as rubber/elastic banded to a rifle stock or front of PC, you get the idea.

                                      According to NAR, apparently the windlass breakage issue has been addressed on their newest gen7 CAT.

                                      FWIW.

                                    • #109440
                                      First Sergeant
                                      Moderator

                                        Per CAT TQ issues;

                                        Some of the reported CAT failures may be due to UV degradation, given current theaters… I remember a fellow that had been to pick-a-stan a time or two, and IIRC, stated that standard procedure for TQs was to replace every month[?] due to UV deterioration- more specifically for TQs worn exposed, such as rubber/elastic banded to a rifle stock or front of PC, you get the idea.

                                        According to NAR, apparently the windlass breakage issue has been addressed on their newest gen7 CAT.

                                        FWIW.

                                        Yes. Exposure to UV light was an issue. We replaced the ones worn on our gear regularly for this reason.

                                        FILO
                                        Signal Out, Can You Identify
                                        Je ne regrette rien
                                        In Orbe Terrum Non Visi

                                      • #109441
                                        wildbill
                                        Participant

                                          The stretchy things are NOT tourniquets, they’re restricting bands.

                                          Attended a recent trauma class the instructor basically said they where better than nothing but mostly they where best used on small children because of their tiny arms and legs. For that reason alone I keep a couple with me and would urge anyone with small children to do the same.

                                          As for using one on myself — have you ever tried to putting it on one handed, damn near impossible.

                                          This whole thread came home to me the other day because of the 14 year old in SC who killed his father then went to an elementary school and shot a couple of students and a teacher. One of the 6 year old boys arrived at the hospital in critical condition from a bullet wound to his leg because of blood loss, he later died.

                                          I am speculating but I would bet that there where no tourniquets in that school and no one there is trained how to use one.

                                          A day later a man tried to gain access to a rural elementary school where my wife works sending the school into lockdown — does my wife or any of the teachers have access to tourniquets — no; would it be a good idea if they had training and access — yes.

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