Quick Clot combat gauze

View Latest Activity

Home Forums The Armory – Gear and Equipment Med Gear and Kit Quick Clot combat gauze

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #109495
      wheelsee
      Participant

        During TX HEAT 2 class, a conversation developed re: when to use any of the combat gauzes. I found some pictures online that highlights one of the locations discussed. I found the post on FB under “North American Rescue” (think CAT) and the quote is as follows —-

        “This is the entrance wound of an M4 assault rifle round shot from 150m. What can be appreciated is the massive tissue damage and bruising radiating out from the wound that results from the energy of the projectile dissipating rapidly in the tissue and pulverising it. This concept is know as temporary cavitation and is key to the wounding mechanism of high velocity rifles. The X-rays attached show the bone damage done by the round. For the full case study see my article titled “Why I’d rather be shot by an AK-47 than an M4” found through the learning centre tab at http://www.tacmedaustralia.com.au
        The main take-home points for first responders and medicos are: Be aware of the magnitude of damage that can be caused by the temporary cavitation resulting from high-velocity missile wounds, and if you find an entrance wound, there’s no telling where in the body the projectile might have ended up!” (end quote)

        Check out the area circled in red…… gauze to stop/control the bleeding.

      • #109496
        Incipient
        Participant

          Great post. I can attest to the fact that the bullet may end up anywhere. Had a guy take one mid axial chest that ended up down in his pelvis when all was said and done.

          In an initial stage; beginning to happen or develop.

        • #109497
          D Close
          Moderator

            Is Quick Clot superior to Kerlix rolled gauze in treating penetration wounds as shown?

          • #109498
            wheelsee
            Participant
            • #109499
              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
              Moderator

                My biggest concern; particularly with the granular, is treatment and possible complications in a austere “post-event” situation with limited post-injury care.

                Any thoughts related to what maybe better for less resourced or less experienced to deal with after initial survival?

                Not sure if I am being clear.

              • #109500
                wheelsee
                Participant

                  Joe,

                  The primary issue in “post-event” or austere environment is that ALL of the MARCH steps are designed to temporarily treat a potentially devastating injury. Regarding QuikClot, Kerlix, or any of the hemostatic gauzes that are packed into a wound –
                  1. how long are you going to leave it in??
                  2. How are you going to get it out (without a surgery suite)??
                  3. How are you going to cleanse the wound afterwards (we currently use copious amounts, think liters and liters, of Normal Saline or Sterile Water and a liberal dose of IV antibiotics, some will also use an antibiotic flush of the wound)??

                  While one could suture (ligate) the damaged vessel, the larger vessels are likely going to require fluid replacement during or after repair (too much volume loss).

                  Remember – the definitive therapy for trauma (especially the type requiring MARCH) is SURGERY. ALL other steps are merely bandaids buying time for SURGERY.

                • #109501
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    Remember – the definitive therapy for trauma (especially the type requiring MARCH) is SURGERY. ALL other steps are merely bandaids buying time for SURGERY.

                    Overall, about what I thought.

                    Obviously a lot of variables and luck.

                    Some will get by with more basic care (bodies ability to heal can be quite surprising), many if not most are going to be SOL.

                    Having skilled people and the resources to support them (even improvised) is going to be difficult.

                    Sorry for the thread drift.

                  • #109502
                    D Close
                    Moderator

                      Thank you for the info wheelsee. The context of my question was for TC3 and IFAK contents. Based on your references, those who do not want to pay $$$ for CELOX would be justified in purchasing Kerlix instead.

                      “This supports the concept that proper wound packing and pressure may be more important than the use of a hemostatic agent in small penetrating wounds with severe vascular trauma.”

                    • #109503
                      wheelsee
                      Participant

                        Joe,

                        One other thought – look again at the 1st XR. The amount of damage done is similar to soft lead Minie balls striking bone. It is also the reason for so many limb amputations in the War for Southern Independence. The last picture is of an EF (External Fixator) where the pins hold the bones in basic anatomic alignment until healing (IME – the pins will stay in 3-6 months, NON-weight-bearing, then cast or splint for another 3-6 months – all depending upon bone growth, the young would heal faster than the old; even today, this injury could still result in limb amputation if infection sets in or the bone does not grow, though the use of bone-stimulators do help). If ever went back to 1800’s medicine/supplies, this injury would have resulted in an amputation, at the hip.

                      • #109504
                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                        Moderator

                          Good stuff Wheelsee!

                          To a large degree we can successfully recreate much of the emergency battlefield stabilization and it’s great that so many here are at that level or getting there.

                          I am just thinking and trying to get others thinking about what comes next after you bring them back.

                          It’s damn scary and no simple answers.

                          Even when you have skilled medical people, the infrastructure needed to support them is vast.

                          Again thanks for your time.

                      Viewing 9 reply threads
                      • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.