Hurricane Preparedness

View Latest Activity

Home Forums Self-Reliance & Preparedness Hurricane Preparedness

Viewing 49 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #90869
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        With a another new Hurricane threat and Harvey fresh on our minds thought I would link some of the various articles relating to hurricanes/tropical storms/tropical depressions.

        Always Ready or Last Minute Preparation?

        Hurricane Arthur 2014

        What are you guys doing to get ready for the Hurricane?

        Tropical Storm Hermine

        Hurricane Matthew

        Got Cash?

        Hurricane Harvey

        Texas Aftermath: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly!

        Zello App

        Hurricane deaths 2/2 secondary causes

        Zello as a source of Information.

        Hurricane Irma

        Hurricane Nate Still Strengthening Just Hours Away From Gulf Coast Landfall

        As time goes I will edit this Thread with updated links.

        If anyone wants to ask questions, tell their stories, etc…please do.

        We have quite a bit of collective knowledge on this Forum and I’ve been involved with many Hurricanes/Typhoons worldwide.

        The basics should be familiar with our members, but the biggest advice is don’t wait until storm threatens for having the basics available.

      • #90870
        xsquidgator
        Participant

          I’ve heard a rule of thumb that you should evacuate for safety, if a Cat III or above is expected where you are (central FL, 20 miles inland from Cape Canaveral).
          Keeping a close eye on the track. Not inclined to evac, if the track takes a cat III/IV straight up the length of the state, figuring it will weaken as it comes north. As always, watching each hourly update like a hawk.

        • #90871
          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
          Moderator

            I’ve heard a rule of thumb that you should evacuate for safety, if a Cat III or above is expected where you are (central FL, 20 miles inland from Cape Canaveral).

            Check your counties evac PDF’s and flood history for your location.

            Consider the construction of your home.

            What codes were present when constructed?

            What can you do to update your roof/joists/etc..?

            Condition of tress on property and relation to structures, vehicles, etc..?

            Evacuation is always the safest option, but it is your judgment call.

            Update: Added Got Cash? link.

          • #90872
            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
            Moderator

              As I have time I am going to address some of the various threats that are involved in a hurricane. Initially they may appear somewhat disorganized in order of appearance, but since this will take time and maybe helpful right now, I’ll edit its format once complete.

              I’ll start with some of the threats I feel are under-appreciated by those who haven’t experienced it.

              High speed winds:

              High velocity winds are something most have little experience with, the constant pressure they exert on structures based on its sail area can not be imagined.

              After hurricane Andrew there were some neighborhoods that looked like they had been vacuumed up, foundations and debris were literally all that was left.

              Regardless of the construction of your home you must also consider the surrounding homes construction if you live in a traditional neighborhood.

              Why?

              Consider what happens to the poorly constructed house downwind of yours when its structural integrity fails!

              Now your not dealing with only winds, but wind driven shrapnel potentially battering your home. Imagine a 2×4 traveling at 200 mph hitting your window!

              This brings up the threat of debris to people who venture outside of their home regardless of reasons. You need to stay inside!

              One point I’ll make since I never say never. Let’s say something has motivated you to risk such unwise action. Maybe your neighbors house just collapsed. Maybe it’s your Sisters house with her 5 kids. Anyway you’ve decided to risk it. Got a helmet? Body armor? Riot gear (probably not)? Wear every possible protective equipment you have with real goggles. Think of the gear you’d wear for FOF training and you get some idea of what I am talking about.

              I wouldn’t recommend it, but best I’ve got for daredevils. ;-)

              As bad as the winds can be remember hurricanes can cause “spin off” tornadoes too!

              Everything outside needs to be brought indoors or secured by heavy tie-downs.

            • #90873
              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
              Moderator

                Medical gear and training:

                If you or someone your responsible for gets injured you need the ability to stabilize them for a indeterminate period of time. You can not expect 911 help to be available; it maybe, but don’t count on it. Don’t forget pets and livestock in these preparations.

                Consider how you store these items so you do not lose them should something like your roof being blown off happen. Watertight protective case.

                Don’t overlook any daily medications needed in secure container. Always have an extra months supply (minimum), imagine needing a refill when your town is gone.

              • #90874
                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                Moderator

                  All of your essentials need protection in case your home is breached.

                  Do you have them in known locations?

                  Not I think they were in the bathroom, but I know they are exactly at X.

                  Why?

                  Imagine having to dig through the debris that was you home to find these essentials! It’s dangerous work and you don’t want to be wasting time.

                • #90875
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    Natural gas and propane should be shut off prior to storms arrival, this will be one less thing to be concerned about post-storm if house is damaged.

                    If you use natural gas you need a Gas Shut Off Valve Wrench or equivalent.

                    Note: In many; if not most, locations you are not allowed to turn Natural Gas back on due to potential fire hazard from unlit pilot lights. So consider my advice in relation to this. You either know what your doing or you don’t. Learn or don’t mess with it unless you smell gas.

                  • #90876
                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                    Moderator

                      Tools and supplies for emergency repairs and rescue.

                      Note: Identify “Samaritan Laws” for your AO to know ramifications of botched rescue attempts.

                      A come along, straps, anchors, pulleys, rope, chain, hilift jack, chain saw, ax, sledge hammer, prybars, etc…learn the proper use of them or don’t bother.

                      Roof damage is very common have tarps and associated fir strips/lumber/tools for rudimentary repairs.

                    • #90877
                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                      Moderator

                        Any repairs you attempt post event should be planned step by step to avoid injuries, take your time, don not rush.

                        You do not want to get injured while dealing with post-storm.

                        Have and wear gloves when handling debris, much of the metal debris will be extremely sharp.

                        Consider displaced hazardous wildlife.

                      • #90878
                        wheelsee
                        Participant

                          Water, water, everywhere and not a drop to drink. Port Arthur and Beaumont lost their water supplies due to flooded pumps. How many people store water?? How many people have water filters??

                          A family LifeStraw – https://www.amazon.com/LifeStraw-Family-1-0-Water-Purifier/dp/B00FM9OBQS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1504575607&sr=8-1&keywords=lifestraw family

                          Or an individual LifeStraw – https://www.amazon.com/LifeStraw-Personal-Camping-Emergency-Preparedness/dp/B006QF3TW4/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1504575607&sr=8-3&keywords=lifestraw family

                          Or Sawyer mini-filter – https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP103-Filtration-System/dp/B00MPH1LEU/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1504575717&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer water filter

                          While the above won’t filter out chemicals (pesticides, herbicides, organic compounds but remember the mantra – the solution to pollution is dilution), they will filter out bacteria and protozoa.

                          Storing water – emergency – https://www.amazon.com/WaterBOB-Emergency-Drinking-Storage-Gallons/dp/B001AXLUX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1504575933&sr=1-1&keywords=Water Storage BOB

                          And, yes, I have all the above as I grew up in Lumberton (check the current news). With well-water, we were dependent upon electricity which was usually out for days/weeks just from all the trees down on the lines…..

                        • #90879
                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                          Moderator

                            Sawyer mini-filter

                            I am a fan of the Sawyer, best bang for the buck in my opinion.

                            Water, water, everywhere and not a drop to drink.

                            Great point!

                            Know the potential hazards in your AO, Should be part of your IPB/Area Study. Food grade fifty-five gallon drums are relatively cheap yet durable, smaller containers for portability.

                            Besides a well with redundant pump back ups I also have 1550 tank for people/animals and a much larger tank for fire fighting that would be better than many sources in a pinch with treatment/filtering.

                          • #90880
                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                            Moderator

                              Fuel:

                              I believe in the 1/2 tank is empty rule, never let your tank in vehicle get below half a tank. this is particularly true as a hurricane threatens.

                              If you normally don’t keep extra fuel on hand, now is the time (possibly 3 to 5 days out)!

                              I you have a generator it’s also time to prep it for use, particularly if more than a month since last use. Make sure your chain saw is prepped and sharpened chain available (more is better) and keep it in a handy location. 2cycle mix and bar oil available.

                              If you normally don’t keep fuel cans filled now is the time, you can always use it in vehicles if hurricane doesn’t hit.

                            • #90881
                              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                              Moderator

                                Not a fan of expecting Government assistance, but know what’s available.

                                DisasterAssistance.gov

                                Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

                                FEMA Helpline

                                Add the following information to your devices.

                                Contact the FEMA Helpline if you have questions about:

                                The help offered by FEMA.
                                How to apply for assistance.
                                Information in your account.

                                Call 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET, 7 days a week:

                                1-800-621-FEMA (1-800-621-3362)
                                TTY 1-800-462-7585
                                711 or VRS 1-800-621-3362
                                You can also send an email from the Disaster Assistance webform.
                                Or write to:

                                FEMA
                                P.O. Box 10055
                                Hyattsville, MD 20782-8055

                                Early Registration is possible and maybe worth doing while hurricanes strikes (see FAQ).

                              • #90882
                                SeanT
                                Keymaster

                                  FEMA is taking volunteers from the regular employee ranks to assist is staffing the call centers. We have a friend who put in some time doing just that. With the volume of Harvey with the new impending threat to FL, calling FEMA may take some time and while getting on the ‘list’ will be important, self-aid will be required.
                                  Take Joe’s sage advice and prepare early and do work slowly and safely if you have to take care of things after damage occurs.

                                • #90883
                                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                  Moderator

                                    Since it appears infrastructure for cell communications is more resilient today than in the past, consider how to keep your devices powered. (Do not put all of eggs in one basket, have traditional radio communications)

                                    Cheaper generators can be a problem for electronics, but charging 12 volt batteries are relatively easy which in turn can recharge most devices with appropriate adapters/chargers.

                                    These little Emergency Mobile Device Battery/chargers have gotten pretty reasonable and are easily carried.

                                    Water proof container preferably a pelican case, but even a double ziplock bag is pretty good.

                                    There are plenty of options. Ask if you need a specific solution.

                                    Portable solar can be a decent post-event recovery option.

                                  • #90884
                                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                    Moderator

                                      Alternative shelter options:

                                      I am talking tents and camping hammocks, even a portable screened in gazebo. Trailers and popup campers are great if they survive storm.

                                      Even if your home survives the hurricane if you don’t have a powerful generator like a whole house Generac power system many homes are not livable without Air Conditioning in the heat. No power, no AC!

                                      Consider your options and related security needs giving these conditions.

                                      Not sure if your home is livable under these conditions?

                                      Turn off AC and use no fans for a couple days and you’ll have your answer real quick. ;-)

                                    • #90885
                                      trailman
                                      Participant

                                        Since it appears infrastructure for cell communications is more resilient today than in the past, consider how to keep your devices powered. (Do not put all of eggs in one basket, have traditional radio communications)

                                        I have one of these and I’d recommend it.

                                        https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01K6TA748/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

                                        Got me through a week at scout camp up in the mountains. Keeping the phone charged.

                                      • #90886
                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                        Moderator

                                          Excess bodily fluids and excrement.

                                          Septic systems will work if you have water to flush.

                                          Public sewers may work for a short period if water available, but can easily back up into home under these conditions.

                                          Homeowners in distress routinely express interest in installing a sewer check valve (also known as a backwater valve) as a solution for back ups from public sewer overflow.

                                          Something to consider Pre-Event.

                                          Portable options from buckets to designed systems can make life easier.

                                          Plan ahead and don’t forget to bag up some toilet paper to ensure availability and protection from elements.

                                        • #90887
                                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                          Moderator

                                            I have one of these and I’d recommend it.

                                            :good:

                                            Good feedback!

                                          • #90888
                                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                            Moderator

                                              Another thought regarding the many internet devices we have become accustom. Many have DSL accounts, phone service is pretty resilient even when power is out.

                                              Phone companies have both fixed and portable generators to keep phones working.

                                              So it is a good possibility depending on storm location and strength relative to your location to keep phone service even post storm.

                                              My DSL Wireless Router is 12 VDC so it is a simple conversion to a battery operation.

                                              So have your scanners, shortwave radios, and other communication equipment available and ready, but consider how easy it is to keep online should your local phone service stay up.

                                              During Hurricane Mathew I lost power, but stayed online. Of course I was just grazed by storm. Worst gusts were only in the 65 mph range.

                                              Without rationing I can run Generac Power system (propane) for about 30 days. Though I normally won’t, running 4 to 6 hours twice a day will keep refrigerators/freezers going and and batteries charged, this can extend my relatively normal power needs for 3 to 4 months which is overkill.

                                              This is more than many can justify; it’s nice though, but there are many small scale solutions.

                                            • #90889
                                              wheelsee
                                              Participant

                                                Fuel:

                                                I believe in the 1/2 tank is empty rule, never let your tank in vehicle get below half a tank. this is particularly true as a hurricane threatens.

                                                If you normally don’t keep extra fuel on hand, now is the time (possibly 3 to 5 days out)!

                                                ABOVE IS FROM JOE

                                                As a general rule, we keep a full tank for each vehicle (20gallon fuel tank = 4 fuel cans) in the form of 5-gallon cans. Double-up on the amount of Sta-bil and rotate annually (we use it to fill the vehicles) – we’ve done such for 15 years without problems or vehicle issues.

                                              • #90890
                                                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                Moderator

                                                  I am a big proponent of daily CCW!

                                                  If you are in a area threatened by any forewarned disaster; if you don’t already, now is the time ensure daily carry for the duration of the threat or actual disaster.

                                                  Even if you are prepared any trip to a public place; but particularly stores, needs to conducted with caution. I am not fearmongering!

                                                  People unfamiliar with higher levels of stress, combined with fear of unknown, and lack of preparations can get really stupid and dangerous.

                                                  We see how people get on “Black Friday” sales, well it can get worse when people are confronted with lack of supplies.

                                                  Stay safe, stay armed! :yes:

                                                • #90891
                                                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                  Moderator

                                                    Don’t park vehicles near trees!

                                                    Seems obvious, but I know of many who paid a price for this oversight.

                                                  • #90892
                                                    HiDesertRat
                                                    Participant

                                                      Joe,

                                                      You can run your Generac generator on propane for ~30 days. What size tank do you have?

                                                    • #90893
                                                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                      Moderator

                                                        What size tank do you have?

                                                        1000 gallon above ground tank.

                                                      • #90894
                                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                        Moderator

                                                          I got the Generac used for $900 with automatic transfer switch.

                                                          The generator itself was hardly ever run, but the housing was rusted out along the bottom. I removed the bad metal and welded up a new lower section.

                                                          The tank came with it, but it was pricey to get it emptied for relocation. It took me awhile to get it filled as I only bought when prices were low and in more financially manageable amounts. I use it for my stove, hot water, and the Generac.

                                                          It uses around 1.5 gallons per hour on a 50% load so it would be pricey to run it a lot, but propane has unlimited shelf life. Not as efficient as other fuels, but the shelf life is why I like it.

                                                          I also prefer it for cooking. :yes:

                                                        • #90895
                                                          HiDesertRat
                                                          Participant

                                                            $900 for the generator is a great deal. Thats a pretty good size tank. Thanks for the info.

                                                          • #90896
                                                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                            Moderator

                                                              Thats a pretty good size tank.

                                                              Why I couldn’t afford to fill it fully at first. :yes:

                                                            • #90897
                                                              wheelsee
                                                              Participant

                                                                Re: AC and electrical requirements. Think compartments.

                                                                This past summer (2017) has seen my house AC go out (1 was electrical component went bad, the other was a coolant leak). Both times saw house temps rise to ambient (90s). However, I had a small window unit (5500BTU) in my cargo trailer that I brought over and put in my bedroom window. At least we could sleep cool. The other benefit is that the smaller window units run on 110 v, 15amp circuits. So a small 2K watt generator (i.e Honda, Yamaha, etc) could run the AC unit (just make sure there generator is outside and is secured).

                                                                Another thought – Katrina saw surrounding states’ Meds swamped with people needing refills on life-giving prescriptions. From this, Texas now allows pharmacies to refill critical meds without a prescription (when the Governor implements the rule). But for those who live in states without this emergency procedure, take a picture of each label. You’d be surprised at the number of people who have no clue what medication they take, only “a little white pill.” At the very least, you need a list of the medications, dosages, and how taken (many meds are used for different diagnoses and the dosage/frequency will be different). I always carry at least 1 week of meds with me going to work (backpack).

                                                                I keep copies of ALL of my medical records, including clinic notes, labs, EKGs, radiology, etc. This has saved me more than once when seeing a specialist but is invaluable in a time when no records are available.

                                                              • #90898
                                                                zeerf
                                                                Participant

                                                                  But for those who live in states without this emergency procedure, take a picture of each label. You’d be surprised at the number of people who have no clue what medication they take, only “a little white pill.”

                                                                  Guilty…I am not normally on meds but when I am I have no clue. This is great advice wheelsee

                                                                  I keep copies of ALL of my medical records, including clinic notes, labs, EKGs, radiology, etc. This has saved me more than once when seeing a specialist but is invaluable in a time when no records are available.

                                                                  Another golden nugget. I was great about this when I transitioned from mil > civ but after that, I sort of slacked off. Just recently started updating and backing up digital copies of everything. Obviously, you want to take precautions to keep these documents safe. I like to keep them on an encrypted partition with a mobile version of the encryption software on the same drive on another nonencrypted partition. (not the only way just one option)

                                                                • #90899
                                                                  trailman
                                                                  Participant

                                                                    Alternative shelter options:

                                                                    I am talking tents and camping hammocks, even a portable screened in gazebo. Trailers and popup campers are great if they survive storm.

                                                                    Even if your home survives the hurricane if you don’t have a powerful generator like a whole house Generac power system many homes are not livable without Air Conditioning in the heat. No power, no AC!

                                                                    Consider your options and related security needs giving these conditions.

                                                                    Not sure if your home is livable under these conditions?

                                                                    Turn off AC and use no fans for a couple days and you’ll have your answer real quick. ;-)

                                                                    I may have posted this last event but I have a portable Honda Genset 5500W. When we redid our electric because of a flooring issue, we consolidated two breaker boxes into one and it had a mechanical interlock for the generator. Kill the main, slide the bar and hit the genney breaker and you are in business. You could probably retrofit an existing panel for less than $100 for the panel facing, breakers and sockets. And with this setup you can light any breaker you need.

                                                                    The thing is that the setup like Joe’s are great if you can afford them and plan to run 14kw of power during an outage, throw a party, bake a turkey and turn on every light and appliance in the house. Plus they can/will fire up automatic. But generally you don’t need all that power in an emergency and you can’t take one of those sets with you in a hurry.

                                                                    I run a fridge, freezer, well pump, sewage pump, water heater and one room full of lights on mine with no problem and can go for better than a week on 20 gal of gas.

                                                                  • #90900
                                                                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                    Moderator

                                                                      Trailman’s comments are excellent advice.

                                                                      Though I remind everyone the quote above was less about the Generac, but about how unlivable modern housing in Much of Florida is without electricity. Lack of well thought out ventilation, too airtight, and in high temperature/humidity weather are more like a sauna.

                                                                      My home is old school Cracker style (very old), designed by basic Floridians before there was electricity and running water. It is far more comfortable in a low tech situation. Even though wood frame, the siding (3/4″) and internal paneling (slightly over 3/4″) sandwich the framing wall making for a far more sturdy construction than is available today. The orientation, size, and location of the windows is for maximum ventilation utilizing natural circulation of the Florida environment.

                                                                      Unfortunately when power is out for days most Florida homes really suck inside and being so airtight can develop mold very quickly.

                                                                      My Generac was too good a deal for me to pass up and is not my only generator.

                                                                      Got some things to take care of right now, when back I’ll explain how my current choices are for a specific purpose beyond my comfort and security.

                                                                    • #90901
                                                                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                      Moderator

                                                                        My current way of dealing with these temporary disaster situations; vice longterm situations most of us have considered, is how can I help out friends, neighbors, and elderly/special needs.

                                                                        In doing so this builds real community and relieves some pressure on First responders.

                                                                        Checking on these people to help them get ready, offer advice, and deal with the aftermath. Should my area have significant storm affects I will be opening my house to many people to ride out the storm, hot meals, water, showers, and transportation as needed.

                                                                        Temporary repairs for those that are physically unable to do so and help for those that are, but need guidance due to lack of needed skills/knowledge.

                                                                        This help has already led to significant improvement in many peoples knowledge and preparedness as each past event happened. This has greatly expanded my network of people willing to help me.

                                                                        This positive image can only benefit me as well as those I am in contact with and has proven true so far.

                                                                        While certainly debatable, my hope is this will lead to a improved situation in a major “Event.”

                                                                        This is where many will raise “OPSEC” concerns!

                                                                        While many know about my public preparations. I have many preparations outside of public view. I have a secondary cabin stocked and ready in a remote difficult to reach location as my next fall-back.

                                                                        I have redundant plans for many scenarios far beyond this secondary location to include options to even leave the country, with many other options available before such drastic action.

                                                                        Obviously some Thread drift, but I am not going to live in hole with my goodies with my only concern for myself.

                                                                        IMHO we must do everything within our power to build community! I don’t have all the answers, but this represents a good overview my intentions.

                                                                        YMMV ;-)

                                                                      • #90902
                                                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                        Moderator

                                                                          Highway 321 which starts around Savannah and ends up in TN somewhere, is bumper to bumper around Gaston and Swansea, SC.

                                                                          I have seen this many times prior to hurricanes.

                                                                          Reports that I 95 is a parking lot from Savannah to the I 26 junction.

                                                                          Something to consider when guesstimating fuel requirements for evacuations.

                                                                        • #90903
                                                                          xsquidgator
                                                                          Participant

                                                                            Thanks for this info/intel.

                                                                            A few data points related re-central FL:
                                                                            1- I’ve gotten word from a few MVT alum in Tampa, and from a family friend who tried to evacuate Orlando as early as Wednesday night, that the northbound Florida Turnpike is crawling bumper to bumper. (to the point where the friend gave up and decided to return home to ride it out- he gave up maybe 20 miles into a several hundred mile escape route)

                                                                            2- Got another report (via MVT alum nearby) that I-75N is crawling bumper to bumper, or stopped from north of Tampa up to and past the junction with the FL Turnpike.

                                                                            3-got another report from a Macon GA MVT alum today, that I-75N in Macon is crawling bumper to bumper

                                                                            DuaneH’s report above re- highway from coastal GA northwest sounds exactly the same.

                                                                            A common unsurprising bit with all of these reports, and my own Orlando experience this week, is that many gas stations are out of gas.

                                                                            Those are data points or information, I think the “intelligence” wrap up of it would be that an evacuation is going to be very difficult, if possible at all. Good chance of running out of fuel along the way without ability to get more, unless you bring enough. You will probably burn a lot more gas per mile going at a slow slow pace in the heaviest traffic you can think of.

                                                                            Critical intel to know, when making your decision to stay or go!

                                                                          • #90904
                                                                            xsquidgator
                                                                            Participant

                                                                              Another local report, from a central Florida guy (MVT alum) who decided to leave today and is on the road right now up to Virginia.
                                                                              I-95N wasn’t too bad north of the I-4/I-95 junction. They’re on US-1 going north now, and were aware via Google maps that Savannah is a mess trafficwise. Currently they’ve made it up to St. Augustine FL and are still moving ok.

                                                                              If I get any spot reports from them along the way, I’ll pass it on.

                                                                            • #90905
                                                                              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                              Moderator

                                                                                Always something to keep an eye on!

                                                                                WEEKEND: NEW HURRICANE SET FOR FLORIDA?

                                                                              • #90906
                                                                                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                Moderator

                                                                                  Well it’s almost hurricane season and to remind us we have Subtropical Storm Alberto in the Gulf of Mexico.

                                                                                  Subtropical Storm Alberto triggers states of emergencies on US Gulf Coast

                                                                                  Alberto to make landfall on US Gulf Coast to end Memorial Day weekend

                                                                                  So even if this isn’t a threat to you, this is a good reminder to check your preps and generators.

                                                                                • #90907
                                                                                  wheelsee
                                                                                  Participant

                                                                                    For those who are new to hurricanes, read this thread from the beginning. And have enough supplies to last at least 2 weeks, especially chronic illness medications (heart failure, diabetes, emphysema, seizures, blood pressure, etc) – these you should have at least a 30-day supply on hand, rotate out as prescriptions refilled. For those needing insulin, check with your family doctor for the pens (most are good for 30-days, unrefrigerated, after opening). For those needing supplemental oxygen (COPD, ILD, etc), make sure you have backup power for the concentrators and/or bottles (at least an E-cylinder) for backup.

                                                                                  • #90908
                                                                                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                    Moderator

                                                                                      With the discussion Hurricane / CQBC and considerations when travelling and leaving your residence. It seems like a good time to bring this back to everyone’s attention.

                                                                                      If for whatever reason you are considering a hurrevac there are things to prepare your home.

                                                                                      Considerations for leaving home before a storm.

                                                                                      Secure the outside of property of all objects that can become projectiles in high wind. Preferably by placing them inside outbuildings or home, if this is not possible tying them down to secure anchors or even the base of trees can be a alternative.

                                                                                      If you have natural gas service turn off gas to home (remember you will need to relight pilot lights), propane tanks can be turned off at the tank (again pilot lights).

                                                                                      If on community water turn off water valve and sewage backflow valve if present.

                                                                                      Turn off electric at interior and exterior panels (will vary in location).

                                                                                      The idea is to secure things that could increase damage to property if infrastructure sustains damage.

                                                                                      Doors (to include interior doors), gates, windows, need to be secured.

                                                                                      Take a chainsaw (axe and saw old school alternatives) with you, since you may need it to return home due to downed trees etc…

                                                                                      Freezers? Well you may need to leave that circuit up, two litter bottles filled with water that can be frozen to fill voids in freezer. A good quality freezer filled to capacity with frozen products will last longer than a half filled freezer.

                                                                                      Empty refrigerator or fill with frozen two litter bottles, kept closed with frozen two litter it will last a long time. Even if you leave refrigerator on, filling with frozen two litters will increase life if power goes out. What you don’t want to deal with is returning home to a closed refrigerator filled with rotten food.

                                                                                      Livestock? Depends on type, but shelter and water minimum. Food is dependent on duration, breed, and expected duration of event.

                                                                                      This is a good start will add more later and others with experience will add their thoughts.

                                                                                      Edit: Those in potential area should start keeping vehicles fueled up as fuel can be an issue. Take alternative comms and a scanner with you to increase awareness. ZELLO and Brodcastify apps may have use depending on infrastructure damage. Remember text messages can sometimes get through when voice can not.

                                                                                      When is the last time you serviced and ran your generator?

                                                                                      Don’t wait!

                                                                                    • #90909
                                                                                      wheelsee
                                                                                      Participant

                                                                                        Freezers? Well you may need to leave that circuit up, two litter bottles filled with water that can be frozen to fill voids in freezer. A good quality freezer filled to capacity with frozen products will last longer than a half filled freezer.

                                                                                        A trick to know if and how long a freezer has been without power (and came back on) is to take a short cup (translucent) of water and freeze. Then place a penny on top. If you notice the penny sitting part-way, or worse at the bottom, your freezer has lost power long enough to potentially defrost your food (which may now need to be disposed of, even if refrozen).

                                                                                      • #90910
                                                                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                        Moderator

                                                                                          First Sergeant’s Thread What Could Have Happened? about situational awareness is a good reminder of possible complications during emergencies.

                                                                                          When supplies get scarce some people get weird!

                                                                                          Stress can make people unreasonable and dangerous, act accordingly.

                                                                                        • #90911
                                                                                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                          Moderator

                                                                                            Traveling among evacuees whether as a evacuees or just getting somewhere can be a problem.

                                                                                            Fuel is a major concern, carrying extra fuel is recommended. Topping off your tank more frequently is a must since you never know about availability. There are Apps to aid in fuel availability, but there is a error rate to it.

                                                                                            Old school CB radio is highly recommended as the information from truckers can be outstanding, particularly how to detour hazzards. There are also Apps that provide traffic information.

                                                                                            Cash is a must have!

                                                                                            Credit/debit machines and ATM’s go down frequently during severe weather.

                                                                                            Extra food and water is recommended. Easy access to rain gear is important.

                                                                                            Check vehicle prior to leaving. Extra fluids, duct tape, basic tools should be available. Fix-a-flat can be helpful in a emergency. Keeping access to spare tire (check spare tire air pressure prior to leaving) is important, sometimes it’s better to relocate it if traveling heavy. Nothing like emptying vehicle in the rain to get to tire. ;-)

                                                                                            A radio scanner is helpful, though be mindful of varying laws. Some require a HAM license to listen mobile.

                                                                                          • #90912
                                                                                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                            Moderator

                                                                                              Storm bump! ;-)

                                                                                            • #90913
                                                                                              trailman
                                                                                              Participant

                                                                                                So help me God it better not effing rain all through CLC

                                                                                              • #90914
                                                                                                Robert
                                                                                                Participant

                                                                                                  Some more common stuff that is often overlooked in the rush for water and gas preps…

                                                                                                  *In the hours before hurricane reaches your area- cool down your house. We are normally back off the grid this time of year, but we are on currently to run the AC units. While we typically keep these at 78-79 during the day, we have them cranked to 76 right now. The house is pretty well insulated and if conventional power goes, the house will stay comfortable for a day or more closed up.

                                                                                                  *Clean your house. In the rush to fill up bathtubs, sinks, etc. this is forgotten. Sounds stupid I know but again, without power for a few days/weeks you are going to have a mess. Begin with everything clean. We can sweep almost all of our house, but a lot of houses have carpet galore.

                                                                                                  *Establish and inside/outside shoe regimen. You’ll be going outside a lot afterwards to check storm damage, clean up debris, etc. Getting back to the next one above this, you’ll want to keep the inside of your house as clean as possible. Flip flops/slip on sandals by the entrance to the house. Your outside shoes will be wet and nasty, and could be covered in all sorts of nasties if their is flooding- keep them outside the house. Keep one problem from becoming a bigger one.

                                                                                                  *In the same vein, in the hours before it gets to your area, have the whole family shower and shave. Again, not knowing if power (which equals water pressure also for most people) will be available for a while afterwards, better to start off all clean.

                                                                                                  *Big popcorn bowls make a great thing to keep in the sinks that they will fit in. Wash water can be re-used a few times. Usually a quick rinse can be accomplished with water in the lines afterwards, or a second bowl can be used for that. We have 530 gallons of rain catchment tanks around the house and another 210 a few steps from the house. This is usually what we will wash up with after the fact.

                                                                                                  I said last go around that I needed to run a line to one of the toilets from one of the tanks with a little pressure pump in line, to use the rain catchment tank water to flush toilets. I did not get that done yet. Course everyone probably knows you just put more water in the back of the toilet tank and it will flush- any sort of water will do- standing water from the yard will be fine if that’s all their is and the only option is pooping outside… LOL

                                                                                                  *Prep chainsaws and clearance tools a day ahead. Have tarps handy. We know someone in the billboard business, so we have a lot of large billboard vinyls. If you know someone in the billboard business, ask him to hook you up with some vinyls. These are usually quite large, upwards of 20X40 or more and pretty durable. If you lose a section of roof, these can be installed in minutes to limit damage before more permanent repairs are made.

                                                                                                  *If you have a lot of trees around your place, consider thinning ahead of time. Look near bases of trees, how they lean, etc. We had a bad storm here about 12 years ago that pushed over a ton of hardwood in the wetter areas, yet the drier areas on ridges didn’t have so much as a single tree down. The difference was in the swampier areas the roots don’t have to go deep for water, and with shallow roots they topple easier in the wind. The drier growing trees have to root down farther for water, and seem to be sturdier. Something to consider in an already water soaked area.

                                                                                                  *To most of us this is pretty standard advice but just in case- So let’s say you don’t have a good water filter (shame on you BTW) and you need water. Most houses or even offices will have coffee filters around. This makes a good general filter BEFORE you either boil or use a little bleach to purify the water. Neither the boiling or any chemical purification will do anything for the little trees and debris that will be in the bucket/canteen/water container. The coffee filter will screen most of them out.

                                                                                                • #90915
                                                                                                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                                  Moderator

                                                                                                    Again its time to consider this for many.

                                                                                                  • #90916
                                                                                                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                                    Moderator

                                                                                                      My current way of dealing with these temporary disaster situations; vice longterm situations most of us have considered, is how can I help out friends, neighbors, and elderly/special needs.

                                                                                                      In doing so this builds real community and relieves some pressure on First responders.

                                                                                                      Checking on these people to help them get ready, offer advice, and deal with the aftermath. Should my area have significant storm affects I will be opening my house to many people to ride out the storm, hot meals, water, showers, and transportation as needed.

                                                                                                      Temporary repairs for those that are physically unable to do so and help for those that are, but need guidance due to lack of needed skills/knowledge.

                                                                                                      This help has already led to significant improvement in many peoples knowledge and preparedness as each past event happened. This has greatly expanded my network of people willing to help me.

                                                                                                      This positive image can only benefit me as well as those I am in contact with and has proven true so far.

                                                                                                      While certainly debatable, my hope is this will lead to a improved situation in a major “Event.”

                                                                                                      This is where many will raise “OPSEC” concerns!

                                                                                                      While many know about my public preparations. I have many preparations outside of public view. I have a secondary cabin stocked and ready in a remote difficult to reach location as my next fall-back.

                                                                                                      I have redundant plans for many scenarios far beyond this secondary location to include options to even leave the country, with many other options available before such drastic action.

                                                                                                      Obviously some Thread drift, but I am not going to live in hole with my goodies with my only concern for myself.

                                                                                                      IMHO we must do everything within our power to build community! I don’t have all the answers, but this represents a good overview my intentions.

                                                                                                      YMMV ;-)

                                                                                                      For emphasis! B-)

                                                                                                    • #90917
                                                                                                      Robert
                                                                                                      Participant

                                                                                                        Prayers for anyone in the path of Barry. Be safe.

                                                                                                      • #116939
                                                                                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                                        Moderator

                                                                                                          Potential threat bump. :good:

                                                                                                      Viewing 49 reply threads
                                                                                                      • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.