Honest look at your training…Verse gear

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    • #122028
      RobM
      Participant

        I came across the article below and wanted to share it with the MVT community. It gets talked about here (on the forum) often, the need for training, rather than the cool guy gear. The article below echoes those statements made. It was a good, quick read and a humble reminder, not only to myself, but I’m sure will apply to some, if not most here.

        Op-Ed: Stop throwing gear at the things you suck at and train instead

      • #122032
        JohnnyMac
        Participant

          The trap people fall into is not spending their TIME wisely.

          The article makes the assertion that you can do some dry fire or range time to get better.

          You can only do that if:

          1) You have professional training to know what good looks like. Bad reps are in some cases worse than doing nothing (read: training scars).

          2) You have to have the awareness to identify your own mistakes (Ex: kinesthetic awareness for physical movements- like weapons handling or marksmanship). Most people suck at this and/or the ability degrades with age or injury. That’s why we have coaches.

        • #122034
          Robert Henry
          Participant

            The trap people fall into is not spending their TIME wisely.

            The article makes the assertion that you can do some dry fire or range time to get better.

            You can only do that if:

            1) You have professional training to know what good looks like. Bad reps are in some cases worse than doing nothing (read: training scars).

            2) You have to have the awareness to identify your own mistakes (Ex: kinesthetic awareness for physical movements- like weapons handling or marksmanship). Most people suck at this and/or the ability degrades with age or injury. That’s why we have coaches.

            This is true.

            I’ve hung out with a lot of quote “self taught” unquote youtube watching types. To be blunt they all sucked compared to how much time they (supposedly) spent doing “dry fire” and the occasional 50 rounds at the range (cuz “you know ammo is expensive, but hey check out my new iphone 21!”).

            You need professional training and- wait for it.... you need to do it more than once. Nothing is more assanine (sp) than taking a class one time with a “check that box” mentality and thinking that is it.

            Think “you got it”? Do the training again and push yourself more. Do the training again shooting with the other hand. Do the training again with a different weapon system. Pressure test it as much as you can (FOF for example). This is why we spar every class in combatives.

            No one gets good at something from doing it ONCE….

            www.jrhenterprises.com

            Lost my MVT class list- been here a time or two :)
            Team Coyote. Rifleman Challenge- Vanguard

          • #122035
            RobM
            Participant

              Well said JohnnyMac. I’m glad that you touched on this point. I completely agree. Last time I was at the range I witnessed the guy next to me doing nothing but ammo dumping, absolutely no fundamentals were being worked or applied. His pistol target looked like someone had been shooting a shotgun at it. Apparently his only shooting speed was rapid fire, or simply how fast he can empty his magazines. I opened a dialogue with him and once he started speaking, I recognized that he was all ego and ignorant, I knew that there was no helping him. Another “tactical tom” on Saturday morning at the range.

              It’s very easy to develop bad habits that can actually do you worse. I did think that the article was a good reminder gear doesn’t make you better. It has its place and and be extremely beneficial if used properly, but training is where the money should be invested.

            • #122038
              JohnnyMac
              Participant

                gear doesn’t make you better

                Yeah, that’s the main point. I wonder how many people legitimately dupe themselves. I would think it’s relatively low. My guess is, people buy expensive kit without the know-how either due to dunning-kruger effect OR just to make themselves feel better (retail therapy). Both are problems though.

                I opened a dialogue with him and once he started speaking, I recognized that he was all ego and ignorant, I knew that there was no helping him.

                Good on you for trying to start up a conversation! Although his ego probably couldn’t handle professional training, he could still be an ally, or come around eventually.

                When it comes to range time, some other thoughts:
                1) Be aware

                Monitor those around you for safe weapons handling. Don’t be afraid to professionally speak up. Also be on the lookout for people lingering outside of the range. Look for predatory body language. I know of someone who was shot then robbed coming out of an indoor city range (It’s a convenient spot to steal firearms!).

                2) Have a plan

                In order to make the most of your training time, have a plan for what you plan to work on and the drills you’re going to do. It’s no different than programming workouts at the gym. Record the results of your drills for long term improvement (this also provides me a chance to reflect on the drill: what went right? what do I need to do to get better? should I run that drill again?. It takes a bit more time, but I find the actual value I get out of a session to be way higher for round count expended. Also, there’s no reason you can’t dry fire at the range. I’ll sometimes do it as a warm up, depending on what I’m working on that day.

                3) Piss excellence

                I mean it jokingly, but perform your drills to the utmost of your ability and train with a purpose. Few things speak louder than dedication and high performance. This in itself might open a dialogue, or at least give you some credibility when a conversation presents itself.

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