Ebola Fearmongering: Again and Again..!

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    • #82665
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        Well once again Ebola Fearmongering is beginning to make the rounds again! :wacko:

        Look Ebola is one of many potential threats out there and yes it is dangerous, however adding to ignorance and misinformation does nothing except boost these fearmongers site traffic statistics.

        One the most prolific of these fearmongers is someone who goes by the name of Aesop from the Blogs Raconteur Report and WRSA. This is a true “the sky is falling” chicken little!

        If he was correct we would already have been living the last four years with the surviving 10% of society. :wacko:

        Whenever Ebola makes the news he tries to push his crazy point of view. How people can continue to follow and listen to him is beyond me.

        So I am going to put several links to our previous Ebola coverage, it should answer any questions regarding Ebola and preparations.

        I am prepared for any infectious disease outbreak since I prepare for everything. If Ebola actually hit here tomorrow I do not have to go panic shopping, just like I don’t have to do so after any other threat. ;-)

        If this is of interest read through the following links first before asking questions.

        Recent Ebola Outbreak/Epidemic July 30, 2014

        OSINT and Ebola Concerns: A Word of Caution. October 3, 2014

        Ebola & The Economy October 2, 2014

        Ebola – Public Service Message October 8, 2014

        CDC Pamphlet for Ebola Infection Control… October 8, 2014

      • #82666
        Hessian
        Participant

          Some updated information i found.

          Ebola virus found in lungs

          Post Ebola Syndrome

        • #82667
          wheelsee
          Participant

            Having been involved in some of the preplanning and aftermath of the Dallas incident (at another major hospital), I was actually encouraged by what I saw and learned.

            The infected person has to be almost dead before you contract this disease. Think of the people who were exposed to Thomas Duncan (the guy who brought it to Dallas). He went to the ED not once but twice. NONE of his family/friends contracted the disease. NONE of the EMS personnel contracted the disease. NONE of the ED personnel contracted the disease. Who did?? Two ICU RNs who were working with him in his last days/hours. So what about all that infected body waste fluids?? It was stacked in hallways because no one would pick it up. NO one else contracted the disease – not EVS (janitors, housekeeping), no one else in the hospital (In all fairness, I do not know if the waste was stored in a negative pressure room (where all ventilation goes directly to the outside)).

            Our policy at that time was if ANY person came in who was a code (basically dead, no signs of life) AND blood was coming from various orifices, we’d call it right there with minimum number of staff being exposed.

            Travel across the ocean and through the wilderness doesn’t really bother me….death will have taken any infected long before reaching us. Planes, on the other hand, allow disease to hop and skip across the world, which is what Thomas Duncan did. And the reason why when he was first seen, no one had a clue what they were looking at. FULL DISCLOSURE – I WOULD HAVE MISSED IT TOO – Duncan was the FIRST non-medical person to have Ebola actually in the US.

          • #82668
            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
            Moderator

              I was actually encouraged by what I saw and learned.

              :good:

              Ebola is down right scary if your ignorant of it, admittedly even with knowledge it’s dangerous, but with proper precautions I wouldn’t have issues working around such patients.

              I remember the first time I was in full MOPP gear working with Sarin gas. I could almost feel it (in my mind). Same way with radioactive materials.

              A lot of mental baggage when working with deadly substances!

            • #82669
              wheelsee
              Participant

                Ebola is down right scary if your ignorant of it, admittedly even with knowledge it’s dangerous, but with proper precautions I wouldn’t have issues working around such patients.

                Bold mine for emphasis.

                This was part of the problem with Dallas Ebola. While CDC was telling us to just wear contact precautions, we were watching the Emory team transport the Doctor who had contracted the disease in Africa in full exposure suits with PAPR (Positive Air Pressure Respirators) while some doofus was directing the team not wearing ANY protective equipment (this was about 2 weeks before Dallas). IOW, we were getting so MUCH conflicting information, our facility, a Level I Trauma Center, came up with our own procedures….which mirrored Emory’s. Here is Emory’s Ebola protocol – https://www.emoryhealthcare.org/ebola-protocol/ehc-message.html

                While there are some fields where throwing caution to the wind may be advisable, working with deadly biological (or chemical, or nuclear) agents isn’t one of them.

              • #82670
                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                Moderator

                  That’s why I was shocked to hear some of the low level precautions being used.

                  I remember one guy pressure washing a possible contaminated area and I was thinking you got to be kidding me! Sure the time exposed had likely killed it, but likely isn’t good enough for me and anyone who has ever pressure washed anything knows there is significant backsplash.

                  Additionally there was no notice given to sewer workers where the possibility existed for prolonged life in a wet dark environment.

                  This is something I’ve experienced with working with some brilliant scientists. These big brains; as I jokingly refer to them, many times lack the basic practical understanding of precautionary operations.

                • #82671
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    That’s why I was shocked to hear some of the low level precautions being used.

                    In fact I think this helps perpetuate some of the fear, since people are imagining space suits and still getting sick, when they were just using droplet precautions.

                    Or was it splash precautions?

                  • #82672
                    wheelsee
                    Participant

                      These are the basic precautions used in the hospital

                      https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000446.htm

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