DUSTOFF 68

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    • #92406
      Max
      Keymaster

        From the description:

        We would like to offer our profound thanks to Adam Hartswick and the crew of DUSTOFF 68 for sharing their story, and to all those involved in this event. Our utmost respect and regards to the families and teammates of the fallen. We hope that this post will inspire and educate as many people as possible so that more lives are saved in the future. ***Be aware that the following footage from the incident is GRAPHIC.
        Sgt. Adam Hartswick was deployed to Afghanistan with 3-41 Infantry, Alpha Company, when his life was forcefully altered by a devastating attack on his unit May 14, 2013.
        “I was the company senior medic (68W) responding to an attack on our second platoon,” Adam said, recalling that day. “I wasn’t even supposed to go outside the wire that day. I had guard duty, but when I heard that my guys had been hit – I had to go.” Adam jumped into the back of a responding QRF vehicle and rushed to aid his teammates.
        “When I arrived at the scene I immediately discovered that my junior platoon medic, SPC Cody Towse and two other Soldiers were dead.” After the initial explosion, Cody and SPC William Gilbert rushed to aid SPC Mitch Daehling. Mitch was still alive and critically injured. As Cody attempted to treat Mitch, he placed his med ruck on the ground and triggered a second device that killed them all instantly. Cody was posthumously recognized for his heroism and awarded the Bronze Star.
        Arriving on scene with the QRF, Adam worked to set up his CCP and treat the wounded.
        “I was doing human-remains recovery and treating the walking-wounded when the [Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD)] team showed up,” he continued. “The EOD team leader Sgt. 1st Class Jeff Baker came up to me and put his hand on my shoulder, looked me in the eye, and calmly told me, ‘We’re going to save our brothers.’ Moments later he went to interrogate a device and it blew up, killing him about ten meters in front of me.”
        Adam suffered minor injuries from that explosion but was able to continue his medic duties.
        “I shook that off and went to retrieve him when I was blown up,” he said. “It felt like I got hit by a truck! My body was ringing like a tuning fork, but I was still conscious, so I treated myself. I was able to get one CAT (tourniquet) on good and tight but I was missing an index finger and putting that TQ was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. Thankfully the platoon leader was competent in TCCC and came to me (in spite of the danger of other IEDs) and applied a second CAT on my other leg and reassessed and tightened my initial tourniquet.” The blast from the IED had critically wounded Adam. “My body was a wreck – I had: bilateral transfemoral amputations, right index finger amputation, partial right thumb amputation, large lacerations on right arm, bilateral perforated eardrums, fractured right hip, mild TBI, various shrapnel wounds, and bruises all over my arms and legs. Somehow I had no torso trauma, no facial trauma.”
        In what would later be recognized as the 2013 Dustoff Rescue of the Year, DUSTOFF 68, C/2-3 GSAB, Hunter AAF, GA (CPT Douglas Hill, 1LT Kelly Ward, SGT Robert Silva, SGT Jason Daniels, and SGT David Hixson), plucked Adam and a wounded teammate from the IED strewn battlefield and raced them to Role 3 care. Remarkably, despite having both legs being traumatically amputated, Adam remained conscious without any pain management until he reached the Role 3 OR where he continued to joke with nurses until he was anesthetized.
        Six days later, Adam was back in the United States at Walter Reed Medical Center recovering from his injuries. Adam’s father, himself career Army, slept in a chair next to his son’s bed for the weeks that it took Adam to fight his way out of intensive care.
        Today, ever thankful for his second chance, Adam works tirelessly to spread the TCCC gospel through his role as a TCCC instructor with Techline Trauma. As Adam puts it, “Every gunfighter needs to be trained to be a medic and every medic needs to be trained to be a gunfighter.”

        I have a post in this same section: ‘Intro To Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TC3).

        From that post:

        M -Massive Hemorrhage – TQ high and tight for massive hemorrhage / traumatic amputation. Seen in the video.

        A – Airway – guys are conscious and talking so this can be observed, but must be monitored.

        R – Respiration – check for torso trauma / penetration / progressive respiratory distress.

        C – Circulation – minor bleeds and get a saline lock in for in case the distal pulses drop out – then hextend 500ml wide open.

        H – Hypothermia – notice that although warm weather, blankets are used. These guys have lost blood and their systems are compromised.

        I am running a TC3 day as part of the ID mobile class in May.

      • #92407
        wheelsee
        Participant

          EXCELLENT!!

          1st rule in trauma – “all bleeding eventually stops” and we durn well prefer it to be because of what we did versus not having any left.

          Even in the civilian world, massive bleeding can result in death in less than 2 minutes. I’ve seen my colleagues work a “beautiful code” (if it’d been medical in causation) but lost the patient because the focus was medical rather than trauma.

          IIRC, the dead victims in FL shooting bled out…..STOP THE RED STUFF FROM LEAVING THE BODY (vascular space).

          How many TQs do YOU have/carry?? At the range, I carry 3 (in various places), I have 2 in my truck, and carry 1 at work (Level 1 Trauma Center). I wish we had had these in the 90s……

        • #92408
          Max
          Keymaster

            Bumping.

            Among all the chat about WRSA, Survivalblog, and trannies, anyone picking up on this serious business?

            :good:

          • #92409
            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
            Moderator

              …anyone picking up on this serious business?

              :good:

              The video is excellent.

              From that post:

              M -Massive Hemorrhage – TQ high and tight for massive hemorrhage / traumatic amputation. Seen in the video.

              A – Airway – guys are conscious and talking so this can be observed, but must be monitored.

              R – Respiration – check for torso trauma / penetration / progressive respiratory distress.

              C – Circulation – minor bleeds and get a saline lock in for in case the distal pulses drop out – then hextend 500ml wide open.

              H – Hypothermia – notice that although warm weather, blankets are used. These guys have lost blood and their systems are compromised.

              The question all need to answer, is their training sufficient and do they have the equipment?

              If yes, how often do they practice?

              Is gear available when you’ll need it?

              If your not ready, what are you doing about it?

            • #92410
              JohnnyMac
              Participant

                :good:

                A brief story of one of the ‘you-don’t-know-what-you-don’t-know’ moments I had. Prior to MVT training, I never gave much thought to the TQ. Points were really driven home at FoF. Up to that point, I kept my only TQ in the insert of the IFAK and didn’t think twice about it. After some experience on the two-way range at MVT FoF, I learned two things: A) it was way too hard to get to it in a hurry and B) there are times where you might need more than one TQ. There were at least two times that I could have kept myself “alive” if I had only had a second TQ.

                Any chance of an optional TCCC day prior to an MVT class?

              • #92411
                Max
                Keymaster

                  If you are in Idaho in May, yes.

                  I put that class on per request. I will not routinely schedule it, becasue t becomes a total pain when it does not fill, but you took a couple of people’s money.

                  I may do something different, such as run a pure TC3 class at my office in Culpeper.

                • #92412
                  tango
                  Participant

                    4 IEDs, now that’s a bad day.

                  • #92413
                    wildbill
                    Participant

                      I may do something different, such as run a pure TC3 class at my office in Culpeper.

                      I would be very interested, hopefully enough people would see the need and sign-up for a class.

                    • #92414
                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                      Moderator

                        Stabilizing such trauma doesn’t scare me, though I wouldn’t mind avoiding that level.

                        My concern is evacuation and treatment!

                        I have some leads I am pursuing in my community regarding treatment, but nothing concrete yet.

                      • #92415
                        hellokitty
                        Participant

                          You know, I think about how many times years ago I was in the sticks in West Texas a good 45 min drive from medical care hunting with rifles and nobody, I mean nobody, had a TQ or a clue what to do with a gunshot wound. This kind of knowledge is not just for SHTF.

                          HEAT 1(CTT) X 3
                          HEAT 2 (CP) X1
                          FOF X3
                          OPFOR X2
                          CLC X2
                          RIFLEMAN

                        • #92416
                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                          Moderator

                            This kind of knowledge is not just for SHTF.

                            No doubt on that. :yes:

                          • #92417
                            BrothersKeeper
                            Participant

                              I would attend a TC3 class in Culpeper. Thank you for sharing this. Those men are real heroes and it is a wake up call to train oneself up in combat lifesaver skills.

                            • #92418
                              Virgil Kane
                              Participant

                                You know, I think about how many times years ago I was in the sticks in West Texas a good 45 min drive from medical care hunting with rifles and nobody, I mean nobody, had a TQ or a clue what to do with a gunshot wound. This kind of knowledge is not just for SHTF.

                                It still happens all the time. At least today most people have cell phones with them.

                              • #92419
                                wheelsee
                                Participant
                                  <a href=”https://forum.maxvelocitytactical.com/forum

                                  It still happens all the time. At least today most people have cell phones with them.

                                  Yep…..check with ANY air or ground EMS personnel and you should be able to hear at least one instance a TQ could have or did saved a life. Heck, even our Level 1 Trauma Center now has has them on the trauma carts.

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