CQB- Night

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    • #96169
      JohnnyMac
      Participant

        A few of us spent some time practicing at the CQB huts in low light this past weekend. The practice was performed with cleared weapons, and we experimented with various techniques.

        We practiced with both NVGs (PVS14) and white light, but primarily white light.

        On NVGs:
        -They provide a huge advantage IF OP4 doesn’t have access to white light/NVGs…in context, that’s a big “if”.
        -They give you tunnel vision, you have to do a lot more deliberate looking in small spaces
        -IR light discipline is still required, be careful with strobes.

        White Light:
        -There is a balance between light discipline to minimize giving away your position in the dark, but seeing what you need to see. This is situation dependent.
        -It’s incredibly easy to blind yourself or your teammates. Some modification of tactics were required (with the lights we were running at least). We were running lights in the 250-350 lumen range, and it was more than enough to blind OP4 (or a buddy). This was in the unpainted plywood walls of the huts, shiny painted walls in houses would make it even worse.
        -Using snapshot flashes or short interval flashes maximized disorientation of OP4. Kind of surprising, a simple wide lean with a flash, then moving back to regular position was incredibly deceptive to the mostly blinded OP4 (teleportation). The possible issue with brief flashes is losing visual of a threat.
        -White light vs white light, everyone is blind.

        @tango will have more to add

        Here is a link to a video of one of the runs. Note, the way it was done in the video would not be the main way to do it, just a way.
        https://drive.google.com/file/d/1oZJWwEOoY9o9o6q_t1MOYuEf_jtFhipt/view?usp=sharing

      • #96170
        tango
        Participant

          @johnnymac hit pretty much all the high points. I will add:
          – We did monitor the effect of IR strobes in the house. Result was that they need to be disabled before entering the structure. This is important to know because if you are operating under NODS and advancing to the site it will be a necessary task at the ORP before final approach. Support By Fire can keep their strobes on.
          – There is no need to have a 1000 lumen white light on your rifle. It will hurt more than help you.
          – IR flashlights are bright AF under NODS, like very bright white light.
          – White light can accomplish enough in comparison to operating under NODS to be an acceptable alternative. They both have their strengths and weaknesses. Unless you can cut the power to the whole area and guarantee darkness it’s probably going to devolve into white light anyway.

          Considerations for night time CQB:
          – Why the hell are you doing this? Unless the building itself has inherent value (power station, food bank, hospital, etc.) or there is someone EXTREMELY important worth the additional risk, this is not a good idea. Burn the place down and wait for squirters.

        • #96171
          First Sergeant
          Moderator

            @johnnymac hit pretty much all the high points. I will add:
            – We did monitor the effect of IR strobes in the house. Result was that they need to be disabled before entering the structure. This is important to know because if you are operating under NODS and advancing to the site it will be a necessary task at the ORP before final approach. Support By Fire can keep their strobes on.

            That can backfire on you in a very bad way. Turning off strobes before entering a structure can result in blue on blue. For the ones inside and the support by fire position.

            CQB is chaotic enough without having to remember to turn them on before going in and turning them on before going back outside.

            FILO
            Signal Out, Can You Identify
            Je ne regrette rien
            In Orbe Terrum Non Visi

          • #96172
            tango
            Participant

              You would advise to keep them on? We tried both the larger and smaller ones.

              This was way too bright indoors:

              These were manageable until looking directly at them, especially if we had taped them over a bit:

            • #96173
              First Sergeant
              Moderator

                The MS2000’s are obnoxiously bright, especially in an enclosed space. I only used those to signal aircraft.

                My first tour in Afghanistan we all used the Phenix Beacon Jr’s, the second pic in your post. When the sun went down we attached the batteries and put them in our left sleeve pocket. They stayed there until the sun came up.

                Part of it is getting used to seeing strobes constantly. For someone who isn’t in that environment very often it can be an overwhelming stimulus. It’s the same with using NOD’s, you have to train in that environment a lot to get used to it.

                If I am in a peer to none peer fight, I am not turning my strobe off. To easy for bad shit to happen. Peer to peer fight, it’s a different animal and you have to train for that.

                I have seen two U.S. Army platoons, from the same company, in broad Afghanistan daylight engage each other. Luckily nobody got hurt. Now imagine that chaos at night with absolutely no way to PID each other.

                FILO
                Signal Out, Can You Identify
                Je ne regrette rien
                In Orbe Terrum Non Visi

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