Corrective Eyewear vs Lasik

View Latest Activity

Home Forums Self-Reliance & Preparedness Medical Care Corrective Eyewear vs Lasik

Viewing 10 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #91906
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        Another fun thing as I have earned more wisdom with age ;-) is my vision isn’t what it once was.

        First reading glasses and now even my distance vision is beginning to change.

        Need to make a optometrist appointment to find out my current status.

        Figured I am not the only one experiencing this with age, so what are the experiences and thoughts on this.

        One side of me gets pretty irritated when I can’t read the fine print on products without glasses, but then again I always where eyepro when in the field anyway so what difference does wearing corrective eyewear make.

        I use the term Lasik generically for any procedure to correct vision.

        So anyone get Lasik, particularly in their 50’s?

        Obviously I’ll discuss this with the eye Doc too, but I got some quality feedback regarding Chiropractic treatment.

        So what are your thoughts?

      • #91907
        riflemaniv
        Participant

          Not in my 50s but I had lasik about 10 years ago. I wish I had done it in my twenties rather than waiting until I was thirty. It’s the best thing ever. Other than feeling like I had glass in my eyes for about a week it was not bad at all. The only side effect is a slight halo around lights at night. After 10 years I still have better than 20/20 vision. It’s well worth the money and temporary discomfort.

        • #91908
          Corvette
          Participant

            Lasik is supposed to be totally safe. However, in the back of my mind I suspect that 10 years from now they will find out that it isn’t and people’s eyes will fall apart when faced with shocks (gunfight, explosions, pressure changes when flying)

            Silicon Breast implants were also totally safe- they said

            (not that I had them of course)

            After watching radar scopes for 4 years in the Navy; I got a bit near sited. Then at the age of 43 I first noticed that I had a harder time focusing on my watch. But by age 60 things started correcting themselves for some reason.

            Now I only wear glasses when driving at night, and it is by choice not by requirement. As far as close work, I really don’t need glasses unless the writing is ridiculous small. It might also be that I don’t “need” 20/20 anymore as I am used to slightly less. My eye site was never bad; just less than 20/20 after the Navy. Most noticeable at night or under fluorescent lights.

            So….I would recommend eye exercises. Your eyes will change a lot as you get older and I would hate to hard wire a surgical change that may be inappropriate when your eyes change again.

          • #91909
            Rowland
            Participant

              I had Lasik over 4 years ago at 30 and it is wonderful. The technology is so advanced that there are a bunch of options. For those with both near and far problems, they can correct for both with a “bifocal” in the eye. It can be expensive depending where you get it done, but make sure you research the doctor doing your surgery. Different groups have wildly different “touch up” rates. Touch up is when they did it sloppy the first time and you have to get re-lazered a month or two down the road. I felt it was worth my time and money because of my age and the benefit of not having to get contacts or glasses or anything.

              I had a professor once that had one eye corrected for distance and one corrected for near and she loved it. She said it took a few months for her brain to adjust, but she said that eventually her eyes would switch dominance without her thinking about it.

              Meet with your doc to see of your a good candidate and if it would benefit you and then look at cost analysis.

            • #91910
              wheelsee
              Participant

                Make sure it is simple near-sighted versus medical condition. I have had vision problems since high school but it took the US Army to actually identify the problem (resulted in medical discharge). After that, I only see an ophthalmologist (MD who specializes in eyes, NOT the same as an optometrist).

                I have keratoconus, where the cornea becomes mis-shapened (like a cone). For me it means I don’t have binocular vision (I see at 2 different depths). There are special operations which can help but, so far, are not covered under insurance. Also, the earlier you have the operation, the better the result. I’m 30 years too late….. :unsure:

              • #91911
                Corvette
                Participant

                  Make sure it is simple near-sighted versus medical condition. I have had vision problems since high school but it took the US Army to actually identify the problem (resulted in medical discharge). After that, I only see an ophthalmologist (MD who specializes in eyes, NOT the same as an optometrist).

                  I have keratoconus, where the cornea becomes mis-shapened (like a cone). For me it means I don’t have binocular vision (I see at 2 different depths). There are special operations which can help but, so far, are not covered under insurance. Also, the earlier you have the operation, the better the result. I’m 30 years too late….. :unsure:

                  Interesting.

                  Back in 1982 I visited an Optometrist in Newport Beach who was one of the pioneers of something called Orthokeratology (Ortho-K). The theory was that near-sighted people had corneas that were too “pointy” (highly technical medical term :).

                  So, he gave me hard contact lenses which flattened the cornea a bit. Kind of like wearing braces for your teeth.

                  I would put them on every other day for the evening and then essentially be 20/20 for a couple of days. Over the years I had to use them less and less. As I mentioned in an earlier post; I now don’t need them at all most of the time.

                  I wonder if they were the reason my eyes didn’t get worse. I haven’t worn those contacts for at least 6 months and after 30 days your eyes are supposed go to their normal state; which is why my current Optometrist told me to go off of them for a month before I ordered any glasses.

                  You may want to try Ortho K. Some doctors will poo poo the idea. One told me “Ortho K is giving a patient ill fitting contacts; and I don’t do that.” Missing the point entirely.

                • #91912
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    Make sure it is simple near-sighted versus medical condition.

                    I will.

                    Need to get a quality check up.

                    Whatever the cause I know reading distance is a problem.

                    At a distance it is difficult to judge, but when looking at a street signs for a turn it seems like I need to be closer that what I used to. Have caught me self doing the lean forward look which is kinda funny. Like a few inches to foot is going to make much difference! ;-)

                  • #91913
                    mark9mmp
                    Participant

                      Its fantastic. I had mine done at 18 so i could pass dive quals prior to joining the Marine Corps. I was damn near blind before and had 20/20 after. However i was young and my eyes were still changin. im 34 now and my eyesight is about 20/60 now. So it wont last forever. Im considering having it done again to get me another decade ot so without glasses again. Its very safe and has been around quite awhile now. The tech has advanced as well since then too. You wont regret it.

                      "Ah, so you're that dick"

                    • #91914
                      Scott G
                      Participant

                        I had lasik in summer of 2000. I had vision that was I think 20/435. I would have trouble recognizing people from a few feet away without contacts/glasses. They warned me then, that I may need reading glasses down the road. My vision post surgery was borderline 20/15 – 20/20. And with a job that became desk bound and staring at a computer screen all day, yep several years ago I started wearing reading glasses. Distance is still pretty good.
                        Highly recommend!

                      • #91915
                        SeanT
                        Keymaster

                          I am 49
                          been wearing glasses since I was 5
                          I have about 20/600 uncorrected
                          20/15 corrected with glasses

                          I have a condition called pigmentary dispersion which is monitored annually by the Optho and he is a surgeon and I asked him his opinion as I have dreamed about having corrected vision since I heard about RK decades ago but never could afford it. He told me to not bother ( he would recommend against) because at my age I will be needing reading glasses (I do) and that it will be so much easier to take off my glasses to see close in that it will be to find my reading glasses a hundred times a day. He said if I was 30 he would do it.

                          My former supervisor who is a little younger than me had one eye done for distance and the other for close in, he is happy with the result but I am unaware if he has had noticeable changes in the corrected vision over time.

                        • #91916
                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                          Moderator

                            Thanks for all the feedback. I’ll see what the eye Doc says after finding out what current vision actually is.

                            I’ll report what I find out, though I believe this may help others too.

                        Viewing 10 reply threads
                        • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.