Apologia For Homeschooling

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    • #86701
      DuaneH
      Participant

        Apologia is the practice rhetoric in the defense of a person or an idea. At least that is the technical explanation.

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        If you homeschool, at some point you will have to defend your beliefs.
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        In most cases I just tell people to “fuckoff” but in cases of in laws or fellow church members, I have found that a more articulate approach is warranted. (Also my wife doesn’t think it is appropriate that I use foul language at church. Plus foul language is the crutch of inarticulate motherfuckers).
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        So in keeping with the principles of apologia, what logical arguments do y’all use to justify what we do the ignorant?
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        My standard response is this: “My wife and I believe in the ‘Family-Centered Socialization Model’ whereas public school has a ‘Peer-Centered Socialization Model'”
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        I go on to say: Historically the FCSM has been the way to rear children, recently with the advent of public schools it has shifted to the PCSM. That was fine when the vast majority of students were well-disciplined children but in today’s day and age it results in a “Lord of the Flies” situation.
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        This response work particularly well with the college degree’ed crowd that has a minor in psychology.

      • #86702
        cynikal
        Participant

          We show them the test scores, my 9th grader is off the charts in Math and Reading comp, our 6th grader is at 11th grade level, and our 3rd grader can diagram sentences and starting pre-algebra. Our 5 year old started the kindergarten books at 4yrs old and is out ahead of all there mouth breathers.
          Then they cry about socialization, in our state we are legally protected to allow them to take classes at school as they want. So, my 9th grader take a geography class and is a cheerleader. my wife and I don’t know where our 5 girls got it but they are all the smarts, good looking, and can shoot! (I know where they go that last one) they are my “night witches”!

          One point of advice if they want to keep going – don’t hold them back, my 10 year old is a go-getter she can do some trig in her head and geometry is “easy” stuff. she pretty much goes through the books herself with very little guidance. my 9th grader is in her 3rd semester in online high school from BYU and blowing it away and is a self-starter, she is responsible to the professor now. speaking to the adviser we asked “how about getting into college” and all that with being home schooled? he said that they have been tracking the home vs non-home schooled kid and that the home schoolers out reform by a large margin and with less incidents with behavior.

          take it for what it is, we have been able to make it work and we can take vacation when we want to miss the crowds.

        • #86703
          Max
          Keymaster

            I just tell them that we homeschool because my wife teaches at the government school. Oh the stories she tells…

          • #86704
            Robert
            Participant

              They usually spend about five minutes with a well “socialized” teenager that can and does have good conversational skills with adults, has manners, shows respect to adults yet also converses and fits in fine with his “peer group” and they stop asking.

              We moved churches a while back. Some from the old church came to the new church for a music deal. ALL of the older folks from the old church that came came up to the boy (him first instead of us LOL) and told him how they missed him, how he’s grown, how proud they were of him, etc.)We stood there like chopped liver :) And that previous church was inundated with people that got their living from the publix edumacation system (would call them “teachers” but have not seen any that actually “taught”).

              For around like minded people, we simply say that we don’t want our child in that indoctrination system (publix skewl). If they are wise and thinking long term, they fully understand that.

              Don’t expect family to always understand. My Dad actually told me when we said we were going to homeschool, that my son would “catch the skewl bus right over there” and pointed to a spot the local reeducation camp bus picked up. I laughed and asked him who the hell’s name was under “Father” on my boy’s birth certificate.

              Within a short period of time- and seeing some actual report cards from the college that the homeschool program comes from, he shut up and there has never been any publix skewl talk since then.

              So give it, people will see the FRUIT of your labor. Till then, the standard MVT answer applies-

              “Why?”
              “Because $%@$ you, that’s why!” :yahoo:

              Other than that, the

            • #86705
              Corvette
              Participant

                I’ll echo what has been said and say “look at the test scores”. On average, homeschoolers consistently score higher than public schoolers on standardized tests, GED, ACT, SAT, etc. Thats a fact. My observation has been that they also have a better work ethic and ability to operate in a mature manner. Again, this is a generalization, not 100% applicable every time. Of course, I’m a little biased I suppose because I was homeschooled all the way through.

                Home schooling allows kids to progress at a rate appropriate for them. I didn’t read till I was 9 years old. If I had been in public school I probably would have been put in some special program for slow kids or diagnosed with ADD or some bullshit. As it was though, I was reading high school level before I was 11. When I took the ACT my senior year of high school I got scores that would have gotten me into any college in the country. I didn’t choose to go that way but the option was there.

                Interesting side story. A few years ago, I decided to apply to the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy. I filled out all the paperwork, including the part about providing a “High School Diploma or evidence of an equivalent achievement”. I provided my diploma. They called me several weeks later and said that it would not be accepted because it was not from an accredited school. I said, ” how about my ACT scores? That would be “evidence of an equivalent achievement” I would think. If my scores are high enough to get me in an Ivy League school they aught to get me in a fucking LE academy, right? Nope. Have to have a GED. So, having been out of school for almost 12 years I went to get my GED. I was concerned about it because I hadn’t done any acedemic type schooling for so long. I had one chance to take it before the deadline for getting my paperwork back to the LE academy arrived. I went and took it along with a room full of people 10 years younger than me. I finished the test before many of them were half way through and thought, “am I missing something here, did I bugger this up in some way? Hope I passed”. I needn’t have worried. Suffice it to say that I passed with flying colors. I got a call from the county education department a couple weeks later. They wanted me to come to some kind of quasi graduation ceremony for GED recipients. Asked if I would speak because I got the highest score ever in my county! I laughed and then politely told the lady that the whole thing was a crock of horse shit and I only took it because the fucking LE academy wouldn’t accept the same test scores as a college. I don’t tell this story to toot my own horn but to illustrate my point and also, I suppose, to give a forewarning to other homeschoolers that it’s quite possible that you’ll run into some issues along the way to a career. They’re generally overcomable though, often fairly easily if you push through.

                The other thing I point out to people is that public schools, at least ones that receive federal funding, which is all of them, are unconstitutional. The tenth amendment basically says that the Federal government can’t do anything that the Constitution doesn’t specifically allow them to do. Nowhere in the Constitution does it say anything about the Feds being involved in education, therefore they cannot be, by law.

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