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    • #99970
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        Field & Survival Nutrition is an interesting topic.

        I hear a lot of talk webwide on various “nutritional lifestyles,” this plan offers X and another offers Y, high fat on one, low fat another.

        I am not going to even attempt to get into the various details of these. If you are healthy and can do what needs to done on what ever you put into body for fuel, great!

        I would ask “Can you acquire these foods in your AO Post-Event?”

        If the answer is yes, then you are good to go, but if the answer is no I would suggest finding a different diet or moving to a place that can support your habit!

        In a Post-Event environment you could easily end up on a true “Seefood” diet!

        Evil carbs or evil fat, who cares if the choice is going hungry!

        If you have stockpiled a lot, great! It will still only last so long regardless and what if Mr Murphy pays a visit and you lose it?

        The above is just some reasonable thoughts on a surprisingly heated at times topic.

        So I’ve talked a little about survival nutrition.

        What about field nutrition?

        There are plenty of options available for purchase which will save some time and can be great, but again they will run out eventually.

        I really recommend making your own, even if just as a learning option and skill to have for future possibilities.

        Here are two links for some ideas, Dehydrating Food for Field Rations and Preparedness and Building and Using Expedient Field Rations. Again choose foods that can be obtained or grown in your AO.

        One final observation regarding diet and high stress environments such as war zones and Post-Event zones.

        In all my “trips” to Afghanistan, I was 35 plus years old. I conducted almost daily trips outside the wire and was physically active, but wasn’t in any kind of infantry or special needs role.

        I ate like a teenager and didn’t gain weight, in fact keeping my weight on was at times a challenge.

        Made the transition home difficult due to having to go back to eat like a responsible older guy. ;-)

        So whats the point of that!

        I don’t think much of what we have to consider about diet will be applicable Post-Event, beyond finding something to eat. :yes:

      • #99971
        Brian from Georgia
        Participant

          Good point. Watching TV and surfing the net will be replaced with weeding the garden and cleaning the chicken coop.

          That makes me feel better about my carb-based dry food stores. Let’s face it: pasta, rice, beans and oatmeal are way cheaper to acquire in volume than freeze-dried meat.

        • #99972
          Corvette
          Participant

            The culture shock of not having readily available food “post event” will drive a lot of ppl stark mad.. Most normal Westerners have no coping skills or experience with such conditions of deprivation.. Even the rationing of food will be impossible for many who thought that “had this”.. when the body becomes deficient of the goods it needs to keep going it will ruin most who have never felt their body starve.. Ive have been w/o many times and its not easy.

            Stress can also make you lose your appetite and this can cause unexpected issues because you are not hungry and don’t feel the need to eat and the effects can surprise you in a very bad way because you may inadvertently ignore them until they are severe..

            One thing I can appreciate about my Survival Pods is they sorta force me to ration because it probably going to be a long walk to the next one that has food stores inside…

            Bergmann

          • #99973
            RRS
            Participant

              Well said, I spend a week or so hunting where its mostly below freezing at all times and I can eat everything I can get my hands on and still lose weight.

              But back to “real” American life and diet and I start to put on a few pounds even if I am working out. So I curtail the fast carbs it, ain’t rocket science.

            • #99974
              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
              Moderator

                The culture shock of not having readily available food “post event” will drive a lot of ppl stark mad..

                I’ve gone without food for many of the military survival courses, but for most it’s not more than 4 or 5 days. Of course this is while still having to do things.

                …you are not hungry and don’t feel the need to eat…

                Having the discipline to eat when needed regardless is one of the things to be monitored. Even something as simple as keeping hydrated sometimes requires watching people drink a canteen.

                I spend a week or so hunting where its mostly below freezing at all times and I can eat everything I can get my hands on and still lose weight.

                Unless they have experienced, it most don’t realize how much more calories we burn in a cold environment.

                Another major fallacy is “they’ll eat it when they are hungry enough!”

                Many people will not eat somethings or at best will not eat enough. If they truly do not like it or it is extremely foreign to them. This is something to be taken seriously if you are supporting others as part of your preparations.

              • #99975
                RRS
                Participant

                  That is true we had a Corpsman who would not eat C-rations, he would go without, nice guy but in a real situation he would be a no-go.

                  I will say in the cold weather that the much maligned salami and nuts are what I crave, me need fat.

                  What Bergmann said but exponential. Murka will make other conflict zones look like play time during kindergarten recess, if we have an event.

                • #99976
                  Andrew
                  Participant

                    All of the above is good “food” for thought. I hope and pray (seriously) that I never get hungry enough to eat liver and onions. I get dry heaves just smelling it.

                  • #99977
                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                    Moderator

                      All of the above is good “food” for thought.

                      :-)

                      I am on the other extreme, there are few of what we would call regular food I don’t eat, sure some I like better than others.

                      In my travels I have learned that I have a problem with eating things that are still alive such as Korean Sannakji and I prefer my maggots to be fried or roasted vice still alive.

                      In the Philippines I eat Balut because it opens doors and friendships, but I have never really liked it.

                    • #99978
                      Max
                      Keymaster

                        Note: This is not Max’s response/content. Just a glitch from the transition to subscription.

                        This isn’t the same, but it holds some merit:

                        I spent 3 months doing a mission trip in Nicaragua. We ate rice, beans, plaintains three times a day, every day, for the 3 months. (Sometimes an egg in the morning)
                        You can have supportive food right in front of you and still lose weight because you get tired of it. I went from 185 to 155 in 3 months and I was trying to make myself eat.

                        I add this to the conversation, because so many “preppers” think that they will eat the same 2-3 things for years and “outlive” the “apocalypse”.

                      • #99979
                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                        Moderator

                          I add this to the conversation, because so many “preppers” think that they will eat the same 2-3 things for years and “outlive” the “apocalypse”.

                          Food fatigue is a real issue that many ignore.

                          3 months in Nicaragua is a long stretch for most, particularly in the hot lowlands.

                        • #99980
                          Robert
                          Participant

                            This isn’t the same, but it holds some merit:

                            I spent 3 months doing a mission trip in Nicaragua. We ate rice, beans, plaintains three times a day, every day, for the 3 months. (Sometimes an egg in the morning)
                            You can have supportive food right in front of you and still lose weight because you get tired of it. I went from 185 to 155 in 3 months and I was trying to make myself eat.

                            I add this to the conversation, because so many “preppers” think that they will eat the same 2-3 things for years and “outlive” the “apocalypse”.

                            Rice, beans, eggs, fresh vegg from the garden, rabbits, chickens or goats we raised or venison we killed, along with fruit from the orchards. We lived almost solely on these for a couple years when money was tight.

                            IMO the appetite fatigue thing is greatly overrated. We raised a young child on these foods and just didn’t give him the option of candy, cokes, etc. instead. He’s a very healthy and strong teenager now. I never remember a “I’m not going to eat” moment and he was raised on rice and beans.

                            Now plantain is a different matter….. I learned to eat that like I learned some Spanish- the hard way, the Spanish took for the most part, the plantain I choked down. I’d rather eat vulture again.

                          • #99981
                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                            Moderator

                              IMO the appetite fatigue thing is greatly overrated.

                              I think we may define food/appetite fatigue differently. :yes:

                              Rice, beans, eggs, fresh vegg from the garden, rabbits, chickens or goats we raised or venison we killed, along with fruit from the orchards. We lived almost solely on these for a couple years when money was tight.

                              I can’t imagine it being a problem with above selection.

                              If someone were truly eating only beans and rice and maybe some fried plaintains for breakfast daily, now that’s a recipe for food fatigue not to mention lacking some vitamins.

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