The Utility of Simulation Training

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    • #101681
      idahocajun
      Participant

        Recently I had the opportunity to participate in a MCI (Mass Casualty Incident) simulation. The focus of this particular simulation was on a school shooting. The first respondsers arrived on scene, performed field triage and initial treatment (MARCH) then transpotorted the patients to our 4 sim trauma bays. There were no manakins…all junior high actors that had been moulaged. We also were able to utilize a “cut suit”, which allowed for cric, needle decompression and chest tube insertion. Needless to say, the experience was incredible and as close to practicing the real thing other than being involved in a true MCI. But more importantly it highlited that Training perishable skills, communication, resources/equipment training and having a disaster plan are paramount to delivering effective care and increasing survivability. Debriefs after the simulation really brought out some key things:
        1. Have a plan, practice it
        2. Equipment-massive hemorrhage kits at schools (tourniquets, clotting agent, etc)
        3. Communication-incident command, resource allocation
        4. EMS coordination with local hospitals-statewide communication, etc.
        These were just a few of the big points, and each of our AO’s will offer different challenges. It’s unfortunate that this is the reality of our time, but as a physician and a father I can appreciate it’s value. The overall experience really highlited the value of simulation. The more realistic the better the experience. Same concept as FoF, CQB, and live fire drills. You don’t know what you don’t know, and training will highlite that and only make you better at what you do. Just some thoughts….here is the link to the news story:

        http://www.ktvb.com/mobile/article/news/health/emts-undergo-intense-school-shooting-drill/277-538337236

      • #101682
        wheelsee
        Participant

          :good:

          From a fellow ED provider with H/EMS experience, what were some of the scene lessons??

        • #101683
          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
          Moderator

            The more realistic the better the experience.

            Absolutely, this type of drills pay off in big ways.

            I have participated in drills like this my entire career, we even had drills like this while in war zones.

            It’s that important!

          • #101684
            idahocajun
            Participant

              @wheelsee

              1. Communication between on scene providers, coordination of resources.
              2. Triage: always reasses! Yellows (mid acuity) became reds (high priority) and reds became blacks (dead).
              3. Equipment: several of the EMS providers didn’t have their “normal” gear, but in these scenarios…you might not if you’re coming from home. So highlited what you carry in your car, be familiar with all types of gear.
              4. Handoff: appropriate information when encoding as well as ED handoff.
              5. Walking wounded: the kids did great with the acting! Making sure patients weren’t missed that were simply just in shock.

              Hope that helps!

            • #101685
              wheelsee
              Participant

                :good:

              • #101686
                wheelsee
                Participant

                  @wheelsee

                  1. Communication between on scene providers, coordination of resources.
                  2. Triage: always reasses! Yellows (mid acuity) became reds (high priority) and reds became blacks (dead).
                  3. Equipment: several of the EMS providers didn’t have their “normal” gear, but in these scenarios…you might not if you’re coming from home. So highlited what you carry in your car, be familiar with all types of gear.
                  4. Handoff: appropriate information when encoding as well as ED handoff.
                  5. Walking wounded: the kids did great with the acting! Making sure patients weren’t missed that were simply just in shock.

                  Hope that helps!

                  Bolded for emphasis…..TX HEAT2 crew may recognize this one…..

                • #101687
                  Dark Knight
                  Participant

                    I am a huge fan of Moulage training. I have been on both sides, training as a responder and playing the victim. I have done small things like CERT team training and large events like an exercise at DCA (Reagan) Airport. It definitely improves the quality of training rather than just reading a card describing injuries.
                    I have not had the opportunity to train that way in several years and definitely miss it.

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