President Trump and the Application of the UCMJ. UPDATE 5

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    • #128287
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        Donald Trump Grants Clemency to Army Major Matt Golsteyn and 1st Lt. Clint Lorance

        Excerpt:

        President Donald Trump granted clemency to Army Maj. Matt Golsteyn and 1st Lt. Clint Lorance on Friday, who were accused of war crimes.

        Lorance served more than six years of a 19-year sentence he received after he was found guilty for ordering his men in Afghanistan to engage a motorcycle with three men on it.

        “Many Americans have sought executive clemency for Lorance, including 124,000 people who have signed a petition to the White House, as well as several members of Congress,” White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement.

        Lorance was released from prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on Friday night.

        Golsteyn was scheduled for a trial after killing a terrorist bomb-maker after he was released from detention.

        “After nearly a decade-long inquiry and multiple investigations, a swift resolution to the case of Major Golsteyn is in the interests of justice,” the White House statement from Grisham said.

        Several members of Congress advocated for Golsteyn’s clemency as well as Clay Higgins, American author and Marine combat veteran, Bing West, and Army combat veteran Pete Hegseth of Fox News.

        The president also restored the rank and honors of Special Warfare Operator First Class Edward Gallagher.

        Gallagher was found not guilty of murdering an ISIS fighter in Iraq in 2017 but was convicted for posing in a photo with a dead ISIS fighter.

        “For more than two hundred years, presidents have used their authority to offer second chances to deserving individuals, including those in uniform who have served our country,” Grisham said. “These actions are in keeping with this long history.”

        IMHO there isn’t anything wrong with the UCMJ, the fault lies with its application by a corrupt bureaucracy!

        A bureaucracy that is used not in search of truth, but in a quest for personal advancement, vendettas, and whose primary goal is to prove; regardless of facts, the U.S. Military doesn’t make mistakes.

        Rarely are charges dropped at a Article 32 hearing when investigators have jumped to a wrong conclusion. Instead the unlimited resources of the Government are used to do whatever it takes to prove its case.

        Hopefully many of these recent victims of such abuse will continue the fight to bring justice for those who have fallen in such persecutions.

        I can assure you their are many more whom you have never heard of suffering the effects of these bureaucratic assholes!

        We are talking at least hundreds, if not thousands of military members.

        It is not just about alleged “war crimes,” but allegations of numerous types that were jumped on before facts revealed truth or innocence. Within a system that would break any law to prove they were right and cover up their mistakes.

        The 95% military conviction rate is not a product of the search for justice!

      • #128325
        Thomas
        Participant

          Absolutely agree with what you stated.

        • #128355
          DiznNC
          Participant

            I couldn’t agree more. The military is still infested with Obama ass-kissers who think our military is the problem, not our enemies, who are just nice, mis-guided boys.

            Other Commonwealth countries are pulling the same shit with their troops. It’s disgraceful.

            I am no longer recommending young men serve their country. Go to MVT instead. It’s the best tuition you’ll ever pay.

          • #128488
            First Sergeant
            Moderator

              Spot fucking on.

              There are several supposedly veteran websites out there saying this is bad. That tells me all I need to know about the guys running those sites.

              FILO
              Signal Out, Can You Identify
              Je ne regrette rien
              In Orbe Terrum Non Visi

            • #128489
              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
              Moderator

                That tells me all I need to know about the guys running those sites.

                :good:

              • #128610
                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                Moderator

                  Navy Wants to Eject From SEALs a Sailor Cleared by Trump, Officials Say

                  Article:

                  Chief Petty Officer Edward Gallagher is expected to be formally notified of the action on Wednesday.

                  The Navy SEAL at the center of a high-profile war crimes case has been ordered to appear before Navy leaders Wednesday morning, and is expected to be notified that the Navy intends to oust him from the elite commando force, two Navy officials said on Tuesday.

                  The move could put the SEAL commander, Rear Adm. Collin Green, in direct conflict with President Trump, who last week cleared the sailor, Chief Petty Officer Edward Gallagher, of any judicial punishment in the war crimes case. Military leaders opposed that action as well as Mr. Trump’s pardons of two soldiers involved in other murder cases.

                  Navy officials had planned to begin the process of taking away Chief Gallagher’s Trident pin, the symbol of his membership in the SEALs, earlier this month. But as he waited outside his commander’s office, Navy leaders sought clearance from the White House that never came, and no action was taken.

                  Admiral Green now has the authorization he needs from the Navy to act against Chief Gallagher, and the formal letter notifying the chief of the action has been drafted and signed by the admiral, the two officials said.

                  The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the impending action.

                  The Navy also plans to take the Tridents of three SEAL officers who oversaw Chief Gallagher — Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch, Lt. Jacob Portier, and Lt. Thomas MacNeil — and their letters have been drafted and signed as well, one of the officials said.

                  Under Navy regulations, a SEAL’s Trident can be taken if a commander loses “faith and confidence in the service member’s ability to exercise sound judgment, reliability and personal conduct.” The Navy has removed 154 Tridents since 2011.

                  Removing a Trident does not entail a reduction in rank, but it effectively ends a SEAL’s career. Since Chief Gallagher and Lieutenant Portier both planned to leave the Navy soon in any case, the step would have little practical effect on them. But in a warrior culture that prizes honor and prestige, the rebuke would still cast the men out of a tight-knit brotherhood.

                  “To have a commander remove that pin after a guy has gone through so much to earn it, it is pretty much the worst thing you could do,” said Eric Deming, a retired senior chief who served 19 years in the SEALs. “You are having your whole identity taken away.”

                  “Why would they do it to someone like Gallagher?” said Mr. Deming, who is not involved in the case. “I think the leadership feels like they have lost the trust of the American people and want to rebuild it. So they are trying to show guys will be held accountable.”

                  The move sets up a potential confrontation between Mr. Trump, who has repeatedly championed Chief Gallagher, and Admiral Green, who has said he intends to overhaul discipline and ethics in the SEAL teams and sees Chief Gallagher’s behavior as an obstacle.

                  One Navy official who spoke about the specifics of the action said the admiral was making the move knowing that it could end his career, but that he had the backing of Adm. Michael M. Gilday, the chief of naval operations, and Richard V. Spencer, the secretary of the Navy.

                  Asked about Admiral Gilday, his spokesman, Cmdr. Nate Christensen, said on Tuesday that the admiral “supports his commanders in executing their roles, to include Rear Admiral Green.”

                  Chief Gallagher’s lawyer, Timothy Parlatore, said that punishing the chief after the president cleared him last week would amount to insubordination.

                  “Does Admiral Green have the authority to do it? Yes,” Mr. Parlatore said in a telephone interview. “But how tone-deaf is the guy? The commander in chief’s intent is crystal clear, that he wants Eddie left alone.”

                  The Navy SEAL at the center of a high-profile war crimes case has been ordered to appear before Navy leaders Wednesday morning, and is expected to be notified that the Navy intends to oust him from the elite commando force, two Navy officials said on Tuesday.

                  The move could put the SEAL commander, Rear Adm. Collin Green, in direct conflict with President Trump, who last week cleared the sailor, Chief Petty Officer Edward Gallagher, of any judicial punishment in the war crimes case. Military leaders opposed that action as well as Mr. Trump’s pardons of two soldiers involved in other murder cases.

                  Navy officials had planned to begin the process of taking away Chief Gallagher’s Trident pin, the symbol of his membership in the SEALs, earlier this month. But as he waited outside his commander’s office, Navy leaders sought clearance from the White House that never came, and no action was taken.

                  Admiral Green now has the authorization he needs from the Navy to act against Chief Gallagher, and the formal letter notifying the chief of the action has been drafted and signed by the admiral, the two officials said.

                  The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the impending action.

                  The Navy also plans to take the Tridents of three SEAL officers who oversaw Chief Gallagher — Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch, Lt. Jacob Portier, and Lt. Thomas MacNeil — and their letters have been drafted and signed as well, one of the officials said.

                  Under Navy regulations, a SEAL’s Trident can be taken if a commander loses “faith and confidence in the service member’s ability to exercise sound judgment, reliability and personal conduct.” The Navy has removed 154 Tridents since 2011.

                  Removing a Trident does not entail a reduction in rank, but it effectively ends a SEAL’s career. Since Chief Gallagher and Lieutenant Portier both planned to leave the Navy soon in any case, the step would have little practical effect on them. But in a warrior culture that prizes honor and prestige, the rebuke would still cast the men out of a tight-knit brotherhood.

                  “To have a commander remove that pin after a guy has gone through so much to earn it, it is pretty much the worst thing you could do,” said Eric Deming, a retired senior chief who served 19 years in the SEALs. “You are having your whole identity taken away.”

                  “Why would they do it to someone like Gallagher?” said Mr. Deming, who is not involved in the case. “I think the leadership feels like they have lost the trust of the American people and want to rebuild it. So they are trying to show guys will be held accountable.”

                  The move sets up a potential confrontation between Mr. Trump, who has repeatedly championed Chief Gallagher, and Admiral Green, who has said he intends to overhaul discipline and ethics in the SEAL teams and sees Chief Gallagher’s behavior as an obstacle.

                  One Navy official who spoke about the specifics of the action said the admiral was making the move knowing that it could end his career, but that he had the backing of Adm. Michael M. Gilday, the chief of naval operations, and Richard V. Spencer, the secretary of the Navy.

                  Asked about Admiral Gilday, his spokesman, Cmdr. Nate Christensen, said on Tuesday that the admiral “supports his commanders in executing their roles, to include Rear Admiral Green.”

                  Chief Gallagher’s lawyer, Timothy Parlatore, said that punishing the chief after the president cleared him last week would amount to insubordination.

                  “Does Admiral Green have the authority to do it? Yes,” Mr. Parlatore said in a telephone interview. “But how tone-deaf is the guy? The commander in chief’s intent is crystal clear, that he wants Eddie left alone.”

                  Mr. Parlatore said he expected Mr. Trump to order the Navy to restore Chief Gallagher’s Trident if it is removed, and to dismiss Admiral Green from command.

                  Chief Gallagher has been at the center of a whipsaw war crimes case for more than a year. He was arrested and jailed in 2018 on war-crimes charges including shooting unarmed civilians in Iraq and killing a wounded teenage captive with a hunting knife. A military jury acquitted him in July of all the charges except a minor one of posing for a trophy photo with the captive’s corpse; for that crime, he was demoted and faced the possibility of further sanctions. Mr. Trump restored his rank on Friday.

                  “I had a feeling that it was coming because, you know, the president has shown the nation he was a man of his word,” Chief Gallagher said in an interview on “Fox News Sunday.” “He knew a lot about all the injustices that went on through this whole ordeal I went through.”

                  Navy officials contend that, independent of the criminal charges, Chief Gallagher’s behavior during and since the deployment has fallen below the standard of the SEALs. A Navy investigation uncovered evidence that he had been buying and using narcotics.

                  Since his acquittal, Chief Gallagher has trolled the Navy on social media, taunting the SEALs who testified against him; mocking one who wept as he told investigators about witnessing the stabbing of the captive; insulting the Naval Criminal Investigative Service; and calling top SEAL commanders, including Admiral Green, “a bunch of morons.”

                  The cases of Chief Gallagher and the three officers will be submitted to a review board, who will decide whether to follow the admiral’s recommendation that they be ejected from the force. The process, which can take several weeks, almost always results in the SEAL’s Trident being taken, according to Patrick Korody, a former Navy prosecutor.

                  “I’ve never seen anyone beat it,” he said. “In cases like this, I don’t know if you could find anyone who would go against the admiral’s recommendation.”

                  For all four men, the review board’s decision is likely to center on the allegations that Chief Gallagher committed murder during a 2017 deployment to Iraq.

                  In court testimony, multiple SEALs in his platoon said that they reported one killing the day it happened, and several times after that as well, but that the platoon commander, Lieutenant Portier, did not forward the report up the chain of command as required by regulations. Lieutenant Portier was criminally charged with failing to report the murder; he denied the charges, and they were dropped after Chief Gallagher was acquitted.

                  Commander Breisch was the troop commander over Chief Gallagher and Lieutenant Portier in Iraq. SEALs in the platoon testified that they told him repeatedly about the killings after the deployment, but were told to “decompress” and “let it go,” according to a Navy investigation. Commander Breisch was not charged.

                  Lieutenant MacNeil was the most junior officer in the platoon, and was one of the SEALs who reported Chief Gallagher for murder and testified at his trial. During the proceedings, though, it was revealed that Lieutenant MacNeil had done nothing to stop the chief from posing for a trophy photo with the head of the dead teenage captive he was accused of stabbing, and had posed for the photo as well. At trial it was also revealed that Lieutenant MacNeil had been drinking with enlisted SEALs in Iraq, in violation of regulations.

                  The president has the authority to stop or reverse any decision concerning the SEALs’ Tridents, according to Eugene R. Fidell, who teaches military justice at Yale Law School. But for generations, he said, presidents have generally refrained from inserting themselves into the military’s personnel decisions.

                  “The president is the commander in chief; he could give orders about how to peel the potatoes in the chow hall if he wanted,” Mr. Fidell said. “The question is, should he?”

                  Regarding Chief Gallagher’s Trident, he said: “A reasonable observer could say this is a completely inappropriate intrusion into the military. If Trump saves his Trident — and I’d bet on it — I would say he will have driven the wedge ever deeper into an already divided military. And that can’t be helpful.”

                  This is got to be the most blatant disregard for the authority of the Commander in Chief I’ve ever seen!

                  …but that he (Admiral Green) had the backing of Adm. Michael M. Gilday, the chief of naval operations, and Richard V. Spencer, the secretary of the Navy.

                  Particularly if above is true the president should relieve both Green and Gilday of Command pending application of appropriate charges under the UCMJ and fire the SECNAV.

                  This is a prime example of the idiots that have infiltrated the ranks within the U.S. Military.

                  For these so called Officers to assume they can continue to thwart the obvious intent of the Commander in Chief is beyond shocking!

                  We are obviously past the point of a need for major house cleaning of military leadership!

                • #128612
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    § 531. Original appointments of commissioned officers

                    (a)

                    (1) Original appointments in the grades of second lieutenant, first lieutenant, and captain in the Regular Army, Regular Air Force, and Regular Marine Corps and in the grades of ensign, lieutenant (junior grade), and lieutenant in the Regular Navy shall be made by the President alone.

                    (2) Original appointments in the grades of major, lieutenant colonel, and colonel in the Regular Army, Regular Air Force, and Regular Marine Corps and in the grades of lieutenant commander, commander, and captain in the Regular Navy shall be made by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

                    (b) The grade of a person receiving an appointment under this section who at the time of appointment (1) is credited with service under section 533 of this title, and (2) is not a commissioned officer of a reserve component shall be determined under regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Defense based upon the amount of service credited. The grade of a person receiving an appointment under this section who at the time of the appointment is a commissioned officer of a reserve component is determined under section 533(f) of this title.

                    (c) Subject to the authority, direction, and control of the President, an original appointment as a commissioned officer in the Regular Army, Regular Air Force, Regular Navy, or Regular Marine Corps may be made by the Secretary concerned in the case of a reserve commissioned officer upon the transfer of such officer from the reserve active-status list of a reserve component of the armed forces to the active-duty list of an armed force, notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (a).

                    (added pub. l. 96–513, title i, § 104(a), dec. 12, 1980, 94 stat. 2845; amended pub. l. 97–22, § 3(a), july 10, 1981, 95 stat. 124; pub. l. 108–375, div. a, title v, § 501(a)(4), (c)(5), oct. 28, 2004, 118 stat. 1873, 1874.)

                    Bold mine for emphasis.

                  • #128616
                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                    Moderator

                      Something that is being extremely overlooked during this “fiasco” is that President Trump as Commander in Chief (CINC) has complete authority to make any lawful order he should choose to make.

                      Both officer and enlisted can agree, disagree, and bitch and moan privately to their peers, but the only option is to say “Yes Sir” and faithfully execute such a lawful order!

                      This included in the past such poor CINC’s as Obama! Which is why the choice of President is so more important than most realize.

                      As an officer you could resign your commission, or as enlisted choose not to reenlist, but that is the extent of your legal options regarding disagreements of lawful orders.

                      The fact that other CINC’s chose to take a standoff approach to their leadership as CINC has no effect on President Trump’s authority to fulfil his role as CINC; within the confines of lawful orders, as he sees fit!

                      I can’t emphasize enough how big a deal this is!

                      Having any officers that think they can ignore something as basic as the chain of command is serious enough, but the idea that flag level officers think they can do their own thing needs to be forcefully corrected immediately!

                    • #128833
                      First Sergeant
                      Moderator

                        There are quite a few that need to be hung in the elevator shaft at Fort Leavenworth.

                        FILO
                        Signal Out, Can You Identify
                        Je ne regrette rien
                        In Orbe Terrum Non Visi

                      • #128881
                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                        Moderator

                          There are quite a few that need to be hung in the elevator shaft at Fort Leavenworth.

                          No doubt!

                        • #128882
                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                          Moderator
                          • #128886
                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                            Moderator

                              Of course it will be interesting if elements within the Navy’s senior leadership are smart enough to let this end!

                              My suspicion is there will be more tantrum inspired attempts to screw with Chief Gallagher.

                              Another danger is even once retired is the fact that enlisted members who retire before 30 years still technically fall under the UCMJ until their 30 year mark.

                              I do not know of any instances of this being enforced, but many powerful bureaucrats have gotten their “feelings” hurt over this intervention by President Trump.

                              I find myself almost wanting them to continue this insanity so it can be addressed. Otherwise this problem will slip through the cracks and more service members will pay the price for this lack of oversight of poor senior leadership.

                            • #128890
                              Max
                              Keymaster

                                Another danger is even once retired is the fact that enlisted members who retire before 30 years still technically fall under the UCMJ until their 30 year mark.

                                True? However long an enlistment, you fall under UCMJ for 30 years?

                              • #128891
                                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                Moderator

                                  However long an enlistment, you fall under UCMJ for 30 years?

                                  No if you enlist; but do not retire, your initial commitment is for 8 years.

                                  So maybe you do 4 years active duty and get out, you still have 4 years left even though you maybe in a inactive reserve status.

                                  After your 8 years is over then you are done.

                                  So if you did 8 years active you are done.

                                  In the past they have had early retirement options to reduce end strength in armed forces. So you get a reduced retirement pay, but you aren’t actually retired until 30 year mark.

                                  Technically anything under 30 years for enlisted personnel is a retainer pay, until the 30 year mark. During this period you are subject to recall.

                                  After 30 years you are done.

                                  Technically officers are on the hook for life.

                                  Make sense?

                                • #128903
                                  Healthhokie
                                  Participant

                                    These Navy officers like Green are brain damaged. First NSW is a rolling dumpster fire as it is and he keeps tossing gas on the fire to keep it going. They need to make this shit go away and get out of the news cycle. First rule of crisis management is stop digging your own grave and kill the publicity. Second, you basically flipped off the CINC which in my business terms looked like he told his 4th line manager to GFY. Third, the dude is leaving the Navy which makes this look even more petulant and petty.

                                    I dont know the ground truth about Gallagher and whether he was a bad dude or had a bad team but I do know how an organization chart/chain of command works. If I was Trump, I would pull the entire Navy chain of command between me and Green into a room, rip assholes at an epic and atomic level and then ask for resignations. Then I would go outside to the press, chapter and verse the SEAL shit show and poor Green leadership, and put new people in there. Are these “Obama officers” or are this just the stupid fuckery normally associated with senior military officers?

                                    If this is normal and representative of US military leadership at this point, beside the inevitable, inexorable social and political decline of our country we as a nation is truly and completely fucked.

                                    Of course, that is just my opinion. B-)

                                  • #128906
                                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                    Moderator

                                      If I was Trump, I would pull the entire Navy chain of command between me and Green into a room, rip assholes at an epic and atomic level and then ask for resignations.

                                      I agree!

                                      My biggest concern is this will slip through the cracks without solving this leadership problem while we have someone like President Trump willing to take action.

                                      Are these “Obama officers” or are this just the stupid fuckery normally associated with senior military officers?

                                      In my opinion by the mid 1990’s things really started this trend we see today.

                                      If this is normal and representative of US military leadership at this point…

                                      It’s possible; though rare, for exceptional combat leaders to make flag officer, it’s far more political than most have any idea.

                                      Additionally; though discussed before, is how many Socialist are within this higher leadership, say Colonel/Captain (O-6) and above.

                                      Looking at Adm Green’s official biography I see no list of his awards, so I suspect he has the typical cookie cutter awards any successful military member would have, but nothing relating to heroism. There maybe a jealousy issue when dealing with highly decorated combat subordinates.

                                      Remembering he was too Senior to be involved in the nitty gritty of the GWOT and his prior assignments were with generic SEAL Teams in peacetime. Entering service in 1986.

                                      As you allude those above him should have dealt with his stupidity, the President shouldn’t have to be addressing such issues!

                                      If everyone from Green to the SECNAV were dealt with it could have a positive result, checking such poor leaders throughout the military.

                                      Unfortunately unless Navy continues to push I doubt it will be addresses.

                                      I hope I am wrong.

                                    • #128944
                                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                      Moderator

                                        Good news for Chief Gallagher!

                                        However it is truly insane that President Trump, CINC of the U.S. Military should need to get involved in such matters.

                                        However the U.S. Military senior leadership has shown they are currently incapable and/or incompetent to command. Our service members deserve far better. This can not be allowed to go on regardless if they finally leave Chief Gallagher alone. Which still remains to be seen.

                                        I don’t believe the UCMJ is broken, but no system can work for justice in the absence of just men and women!

                                        What is needed is a major review of these so called leaders followed by a purge of these personnel. Some need to be simply removed, but many need appropriate charges brought and if found guilty punished as required.

                                      • #129085
                                        DuaneH
                                        Participant

                                          I knew Matt Golsteyn. Trump did the right thing.

                                          The problem with the military is that it is more worried about being politically correct and advancing the careers of the upper echelons of the officer corps than it is with fostering the warrior mindset and Gee I don’t know things like winning battles and wars.

                                        • #129091
                                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                          Moderator

                                            The problem with the military is that it is more worried about being politically correct and advancing the careers of the upper echelons of the officer corps than it is with fostering the warrior mindset and Gee I don’t know things like winning battles and wars.

                                            You are correct!

                                            A bunch of corrupt managers, instead of leaders interested in doing the right thing!

                                          • #129101
                                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                            Moderator

                                              U.S. Navy secretary backs SEAL’s expulsion review, despite Trump objection

                                              Article:

                                              HALIFAX, Nova Scotia (Reuters) – U.S. Navy Secretary Richard Spencer said on Friday a Navy SEAL convicted of battlefield misconduct should face a board of peers weighing whether to oust him from the elite force, despite President Donald Trump’s assertion that he not be expelled.

                                              “I believe the process matters for good order and discipline,” Spencer told Reuters, weighing in on a confrontation between Trump and senior Navy officials over the outcome of a high-profile war-crimes case.

                                              A military jury in July convicted Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher of illegally posing for pictures with the corpse of an Islamic State fighter but acquitted him of murder in the detainee’s death. Gallagher also was cleared of charges that he deliberately fired on unarmed civilians.

                                              Although spared a prison sentence, he was demoted in rank and pay grade for his conviction, which stemmed from a 2017 deployment in Iraq.

                                              Last Friday, Trump intervened in the case, ordering the Navy to restore Gallagher’s rank and pay and clearing the way for him to retire on a full pension.

                                              But Navy brass notified Gallagher, 40, on Tuesday that a five-member panel of fellow Navy commandos would convene on Dec. 2 to review his case and recommend whether he is fit to remain in the SEALs.

                                              A decision as to whether Gallagher is ejected from the SEALs, stripping him of his special warfare Trident Pin, ultimately rests with the Navy’s personnel command in Washington. Gallagher would retain his rank but be assigned to other duty, though his lawyer has said he will be eligible to retire soon.

                                              On Thursday, Trump lashed out at the proceedings, declaring on Twitter: “The Navy will NOT be taking away Warfighter and Navy Seal Eddie Gallagher’s Trident Pin. This case was handled very badly from the beginning. Get back to business!”

                                              The Navy responded with a statement saying it would follow “lawful orders” from the president to halt the review but was awaiting further guidance, suggesting his Twitter post was not considered a formal directive.

                                              ‘THAT’S MY JOB’
                                              Asked whether he believed the proceedings against Gallagher should continue, Spencer, in an interview at the Halifax International Security Forum in Nova Scotia, said, “Yes, I do.”

                                              “I think we have a process in place, which we’re going forward with, and that’s my job,” he added.

                                              It was not immediately clear how the showdown between Trump and Navy leaders might affect separate trident review board proceedings convened for three of Gallagher’s commanding officers.
                                              Critics have said Trump’s grants of clemency last week to Gallagher, and to two Army officers separately accused of war crimes in Afghanistan, will undermine military justice and send a message that battlefield atrocities will be tolerated.

                                              The trident review hearings for Gallagher and his immediate superiors were ordered by the commander of Naval Special Warfare, Rear Admiral Collin Green.

                                              Gallagher’s lawyer, Timothy Parlatore, contested the Navy’s move to oust his client in a complaint filed on Monday with the Defense Department’s inspector general, accusing Green of challenging Trump’s authority as commander in chief.

                                              Spencer acknowledged that Trump has the power to restore Gallagher’s SEAL status if Navy commanders decide to expel him, saying, “The commander in chief is the commander in chief … and he can do what he wants.”

                                              I stand by this…

                                              …the President should relieve both Green and Gilday of Command pending application of appropriate charges under the UCMJ and fire the SECNAV.

                                              …can agree, disagree, and bitch and moan privately to their peers, but the only option is to say “Yes Sir” and faithfully execute such a lawful order!

                                              Publicaly disagreeing with the CINC when part of the chain of command is completely inappropriate and certainly isn’t an example of “good order and discipline!”

                                              Damn hypocrites!

                                            • #129387
                                              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                              Moderator

                                                Pentagon: Defense Secretary Has Fired Navy Secretary for ‘Lack of Candor’ on Eddie Gallagher Case

                                                Article:

                                                The Pentagon announced Sunday afternoon that Defense Secretary Mark Esper has asked Navy Secretary Richard Spencer to resign for not telling him that he had a private conversation with the White House over the taking away of Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher’s Navy SEAL Trident pin.

                                                “Secretary of Defense Mark T. Esper has asked for the resignation of Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer after losing trust and confidence in him regarding his lack of candor over conversations with the White House involving the handling of Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher,” the Pentagon’s chief spokesman Jonathan Hoffman said in a statement Sunday.

                                                Trump had intervened in recent weeks to restore Gallagher’s rank, which was reduced by the Navy after he was convicted of taking a photo with a deceased Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) fighter.

                                                The Navy then announced it would launch a review board to consider whether to take away Gallagher’s Trident pin, essentially kicking him out of the Navy SEALs. Trump tweeted that the Navy would do no such thing, but Spencer said it would proceed until receiving an official order from the president, which he would follow.

                                                The Pentagon said in its statement that after Esper and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley spoke with President Trump on Friday regarding Gallagher’s case, Esper learned that “Spencer had previously and privately proposed to the White House — contrary to Spencer’s public position — to restore Gallagher’s rank and allow him to retire with his Trident pin.”

                                                “When recently asked by Secretary Esper, Secretary Spencer confirmed that despite multiple conversations on the Gallagher matter, Secretary Esper was never informed by Secretary Spencer of his private proposal,” Hoffman said.

                                                Hoffman also announced that Esper has directed that Gallagher retain his Trident pin, and that Navy Under Secretary Thomas Modley would now be acting Navy secretary.

                                                Hoffman said:

                                                Secretary Esper’s position with regard to UCMJ, disciplinary, and fitness for duty actions has always been that the process should be allowed to play itself out objectively and deliberately, in fairness to all parties. However, at this point, given the events of the last few days, Secretary Esper has directed that Gallagher retain his Trident pin. Secretary Esper will meet with Navy Under Secretary (now Acting Secretary) Thomas Modley and the Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Michael Gilday on Monday morning to discuss the way ahead.

                                                The Pentagon statement included a quote from Esper: “I am deeply troubled by this conduct shown by a senior DOD official. Unfortunately, as a result I have determined that Secretary Spencer no longer has my confidence to continue in his position. I wish Richard well.”

                                                Esper has proposed that Ambassador Kenneth Braithwaite, current U.S. Ambassador to Norway and a retired Navy Rear Admiral, be considered as the next Secretary of the Navy, the statement said.

                                                This should be good for Chief Gallagher.

                                                However I am deeply concerned the now Former SECNAV may become the sacrificial end of this!

                                                There are many others within the Navy’s senior uniformed leadership that need charges appointed! Without that, this problem will not be solved and will continue the injustices demonstrated in this case.

                                                I hope this just the beginning of the house cleaning needed, but I suspect they will pretend this is the solution!

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