Operational Experience in Vietnam, 1969, Mines and Boobytraps.

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    • #62497
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        Well here is some Old School knowledge.

        Operational Experience in Vietnam, 1969, Mines and Boobytraps.

        Lots of possible applications.

      • #62498
        D Close
        Moderator

          There have been so many good posts and links lately, I am scrambling to absorb all the great info. GWNS, great link here. Thank you for your always great contributions! I was intrigued at how the VC marked their mined areas. Dogs were effective sensors vs. booby traps. The need to avoid patterns is highlighted. Much more. Great read. Do you have a copy of Hackworth’s and Marshall’s “Vietnam Primer”?

        • #62499
          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
          Moderator

            I’ll look. I don’t even know how many PDF’s I have. Been downloading and backing them up for years. Free information is great.

            Trying to organize them now, but it is slow going.

            The ones that are too big for attachments and I can’t find easily online will need to be distributed.

            We are talking thousands of files.

          • #62500
            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
            Moderator

              Dogs were effective sensors vs. booby traps.

              This is something I am still investigating, the idea of Scout Dogs for armed citizens. Obviously not everyone would have or need one, but there are many serious amateur dog trainers in our community. The sensor capability of dogs is such a force multiplier that it can not be overlooked. Scout dogs could save many lives in any SHTF scenario.

              Frankly I am surprised it hasn’t received more consideration.

            • #62501
              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
              Moderator

                While not the later version of “The Vietnam Primer” book that I believe D Close asked about, this link to the original “Vietnam Primer” by Brigadier General Marshall and Lieutenant Colonel David Hackworth has some good information.

                Just remember to balance modern lessons learned with this.

                It may be worth either printing this or saving it if you find the information worthwhile.

              • #62502
                Andrew
                Participant

                  Great read. Thanks for posting.

                • #62503
                  Max
                  Keymaster

                    This is not Max’s post, but a glitch from a transition.

                    Frankly I am surprised it hasn’t received more consideration.

                    People balk at the amount of time and treasure that it takes to train such a dog. It only takes a fraction of the dedication to turn themselves into a viable tactical asset, and it seems even that is asking a lot. Dogs? Good luck…

                  • #62504
                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                    Moderator

                      It only takes a fraction of the dedication to turn themselves into a viable tactical asset, and it seems even that is asking a lot. Dogs? Good luck…

                      Unfortunately I think your right.

                      I figure small percentage of people interested in the material on this Forum (or similar) are into training even basic K9 skills. Then a equally small percentage or less would actually attempt training a Scout Dog.

                      Overall I think it’s sad, since properly utilized K9’s can and do save lives in the Scout role. I prefer the old school Scout term vice Patrol, since due to limited resources using K9’s for attack/take down work is too dangerous for such a valuable K9 sensor in our circumstances.

                    • #62505
                      Max
                      Keymaster

                        This is not Max’s post, but a glitch from a transition.

                        Besides being to valuable, dogs are just not all that good at taking down humans period. Hollywood bullshit. Dispatching a lone attacking dog is rather easy, if potentially painful and risky for infection….

                      • #62506
                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                        Moderator

                          Dispatching a lone attacking dog is rather easy,

                          True!

                          War Dogs (attack dogs) in the classical old school use have not really been used much in modern warfare.

                          Bottom line is K9’s need back up like any other team member.

                        • #62507
                          Max
                          Keymaster

                            This is not Max’s post, but a glitch from a transition.

                            Here is the pdf version of the Vietnam primer site.

                          • #62508
                            Max
                            Keymaster

                              This is not Max’s post, but a glitch from a transition.

                              Very cool thank you

                            • #62509
                              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                              Moderator

                                Time for another look at some practical old school information.

                              • #62510
                                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                Moderator

                                  JohnnyMac’s recent Thread Night Hike AAR reminded me of a podcast I heard recently.

                                  A mid 90’s through GWOT SEAL was interviewing a Vietnam war SEAL. The Vietnam guy was discussing their night operations. At one point the Vietnam SEAL was relating using a small flexible sampling branch to detect tripwires. The modern SEAL was unfamiliar with this technique.

                                  The idea is during daytime the sampling will visually bend when it’s used for detection of tripwires. During night operations the sampling will provide feedback by feel similar to a nibble while fishing. Then once discovered the pointman would physically identify the tripwire to the man behind him and then step over tripwire and continue on. This would be repeated until group had passed obstacle.

                                  Consider that these old school techniques may still be of value and how the modern vets maybe ignorant of these.

                                  Not to mention this Thread was overdue for a bump! ;-)

                                • #62511
                                  Hessian
                                  Participant

                                    Joe,

                                    Over a decade ago if you were to tell me that pictures, documents even whole websites would disappear from the internet I wouldn’t have believe you. Thank you for taking the time to archive such documents. :good:

                                    Now I have heard about using something out in front to identify trip wires back in Nam. I forget if I read it in one of the many books I read about Vietnam or if it was a story from a veteran. Sad to hear that our military gets amnesia so quickly.

                                  • #62512
                                    Roadkill
                                    Participant

                                      I like the idea of sapling. Make sure you use a fresh cut, rather than a dried stick. Sapling needs to be supple. Think like ultra light ice fishing rod.
                                      Great information.

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