Jungle Green (1964)

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    • #110033
      Max
      Keymaster

        Excellent video. Dated, and TTPs / equipment have been tightened up, but very good value.

      • #110034
        Max
        Keymaster

          Here you go, a little more updated. Re: Joe’s FL Swamp class!

          In fact, WV in the summer is very similar to some primary jungle environments.

        • #110035
          DiznNC
          Participant

            It is interesting to see the difference in technique between the two time periods. You could certainly see improvement.

            I think one factor is that the weapons and equipment were much lighter. There is a huge difference between carrying a FAL and an AR all day. And the old packs were shit. Having one with decent shoulder straps makes a big difference between tolerable and miserable.

            I went through OCS right when they were switching out the M-14 for the M-16. It was a big difference between carrying the two. We marched in the old “field transport packs” just like you saw in the old newsreels. Getting the ALICE with padded shoulder straps was huge.

            And yes we finally did get a decent jungle boot. When you had water sloshing around all day in the old issue boots you feet were soon a wreck. We coated them with vasilene inside and out, and used the heavy wool “dive socks” which we found stayed up better with less wrinkling especially when wet.

            We did our jungle training in Subic Bay, Philippines. We had Negrito guides who taught us the ropes. We learned how to cook rice in a split bamboo section. We learned how to build a sleeping platform. You quickly find out why they tell you not to use green bamboo; that shit has fine hairs which will keep you up all night itching.

            The machete is called a bolo over there and is cut from old leaf springs. Must have equipment. The locals would sell you one for 8 bucks, which was a full day’s wages to them back then. It was heavier in the forward portion, which made chopping much easier.

            We practiced Dead Reckoning Land Nav, which is practically the only way to get around. Once we got pretty good at it, we would be humbled by the little kids, who had an uncanny knack of finding you, anywhere, and selling you a coke or candy bar. Eight hour patrol with a dozen check points, and they would still home in on you like a laser.

            Yeah WV is a little like the jungle. The terrain is very similar; it’s almost as hot, but thankfully not as many bugs. In the jungle, everything has thorns. You would get all slash up across any exposed skin. It had to be treated with mercurochrome or would fester in 24 hours.

          • #110036
            Brian from Georgia
            Participant

              Great videos.

            • #110037
              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
              Moderator

                We did our jungle training in Subic Bay, Philippines. We had Negrito guides who taught us the ropes.

                JEST is now a adventure camp open to the public!

                Here is a quick overview of Ranger School Florida Phase right here in Florida.

                Some family fun!

              • #110038
                Max
                Keymaster

                  There is plenty of nice flat woodland for training, staying away from the waterways. UTM classes could be run easily, ideal. Live fire would need backstop berms pushed up.

                • #110039
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    UTM classes could be run easily, ideal.

                    You know I hadn’t really thought about a UTM course. Would open a lot of possibilities.

                  • #110040
                    Max
                    Keymaster

                      Jungle training is pure infantry work. It’s a great instructional / operational environment. In this next video, alumni may see some familiarity! Break contact drills were originally developed for 4 man patrols in a jungle environment (SAS), then adapted in their various forms.

                    • #110041
                      DiznNC
                      Participant

                        JEST is now adventure training. Jeesh.

                      • #110042
                        RRS
                        Participant

                          F*ck the jungle, hate the jungle. All wars from now on must be fought in temperate climates, Rhodesia for example. Though for the record the Black Mamba snakes are scary monsters in their own right, my Afrikaner PH a stout robust hearty fellow was even shook up when we spotted one near our water hole.

                          Anyway, rule #1 no jungle.

                        • #110043
                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                          Moderator

                            JEST is now adventure training. Jeesh.

                            In their defense they still train a lot of military and if I ever go visit the PI (a good possibility), I might try their three day course for php1,100.

                            With current exchange rate thats $22 usd.

                            Fun to compare it to the old.

                          • #110044
                            Thomas
                            Participant

                              The green mamba strikes from the low tree branches. I hate snakes anywhere on the African continent. They must be purified by fire.

                            • #110045
                              JohnnyMac
                              Participant

                                Thanks Max, that 1999 video was cool. One of my observations, given the ammo = time concept, is how quickly the guys who were firing on auto had to reload. With that kind of fire rate you had either be carrying a ton of ammo or be super fast.

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