FARC Loadout

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    • #72955
      Corvette
      Participant

        Hey Gang – I’m preparing this week’s executive intelligence summary and came across some interesting information about the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), a Marxist guerrilla group in Colombia.

        “[The guerrilla fighter] describes everyday life in the jungle: “Your backpack always has to be packed and ready to go, always. It should contain a mosquito net, tent, uniform, underwear, socks, a blanket, two bottles of gasoline, rice, beans, lentils, spaghetti, sugar, salt and flour. There are normally 20 kilos [44 lbs.] of food in the backpack, which weighs 30 to 35 kilos [66-77 lbs].”

        Thoughts?

      • #72956
        D Close
        Moderator

          Sam, I’m shocked they are packing that much food. Gasoline? WTF? I’m guessing these guys don’t have too great of a support network. So, the FARC is more worried about beans at this point, than bullets? Maybe we need to rethink our loads too? 20k of food will bump some gear, no question. Maybe in the jungle, they don’t need to worry about water too much so that may be a trade off.

        • #72957
          JohnyMac
          Participant

            Huh? Like what “D” said, “I’m shocked they are packing that much food. Gasoline?”

            I don’t get the tent either. If they used a hammock with roof and mosquito netting the pack would al least be a few pounds lighter.

            On another note a realization came to me as I was typing. I am sure that the FARC does not have access to the light weight equipment as we do, e.g. freeze dried foods, or even MRE’s, tropical sleeping bag, etc. The gas might be for cooking in a pressurized stove.

            Who knows, I would like to see a whole list of what they carry.

          • #72958
            Max
            Keymaster

              I’m assuming they carry the ammo on the fighting load, but this is probably a basic sustainment load that is then supplemented with other equipment based on mission. I doubt that “tent” means “tent.” Probably more of a tarp/poncho hooch set up. The gas is probably spread loaded throughout to supply a communal stove.

            • #72959
              Corvette
              Participant

                Yeah, I think the gas is so they don’t have to build fires to cook food. The smoke would be a neon sign that reads: “BOMB GOES HERE.” Something to think about as well…

                Here’s the entire article: http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/a-meeting-with-dutch-farc-member-tanja-nijmeijer-a-966813.html#ref=rss

                ^ Must read

              • #72960
                JohnyMac
                Participant

                  Thank you Sam for posting the link!

                  Ms. Nijmeijer whom the article was written, reminds me of a women who joins a motor cycle gang.

                  Some of my leftist friends (Yes I have a few) say the same thing about Socialism and Communism. “When we move from Capitalism to Communism it will be so much better than Communism under: Lenin, Stalin, Mao, Minh, Sung, Tito, Castro…To name a few.

                  It’s the same song every time. “We will do it better.” :negative:

                • #72961
                  Corvette
                  Participant

                    I “get” their load out:

                    Long range sustainment load for a movement in remote areas where existing is more important than ambushing their targets.

                  • #72962
                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                    Moderator

                      The smoke would be a neon sign that reads: “BOMB GOES HERE.” Something to think about as well…

                      Aerial bombs are scary, helicopter gunships as described in article are scary, but there is something else that is truly terrifying.

                      I’ve done some work in South and Central America. I witnessed something that I would not want to be on the receiving end of.

                      We hear many people worrying about the high tech weapons we could face someday. We must not forget there are plenty of “Old School” weapons systems that are still quite effective that are not high tech.

                      This airframe was introduced in 1936, it’s attack role didn’t come until 1964.

                      I am talking about the AC-47 “Puff, the Magic Dragon” which is still in operational use by both Columbia and El Salvador.

                      It might not be a AC-130, but I am telling you it is a devastating platform.

                      Sorry for the thread drift, but this subject brought back some interesting memories from “back in the day!”

                      “Casebook on Insurgency and Revolutionary Warfare, Vol. II: 1962-2009” has some good background on FARC.

                    • #72963
                      Chris
                      Moderator

                        Its actually interesting, not having read the article yet, what the gasoline brings for the soldier, and perhaps back on us and we could benefit from it. You now have a small destructive device for burning enemy equipment (some rigging involved of course) and now you have, in an urban environment, part of an E and E plan if your hot wire skills aren’t too rusty, you just gave yourself a quick couple of miles away from whatever you are bugging out from, maybe just enough to get gear and fam over a mountain range…..i know I’m stretching here but you do have a lot of possibilities with this. As for food, well you can carry a small amount of rice to go a looong way without weighing down too much of your kit

                      • #72964
                        Max
                        Keymaster

                          Do read the article if you haven’t done so. Definitely worth your time. There are some interesting nuggets of guerrilla fieldcraft as well as some valuable insights into the motivations of the leftist militant (you think we won’t have to deal with those, you’re kidding yourself: not all lefties are disarmed pantywaists) and the effects of a multigenerational insurgency on those doing the fighting.

                        • #72965
                          Pericles
                          Participant

                            I’m assuming they carry the ammo on the fighting load, but this is probably a basic sustainment load that is then supplemented with other equipment based on mission. I doubt that “tent” means “tent.” Probably more of a tarp/poncho hooch set up. The gas is probably spread loaded throughout to supply a communal stove.

                            Tent is a translation error. The German word for a “shelter half” carried by a soldier is Zeltbahn, and the translater probably went for Zelt which is a tent and the closest word in German that could be found in the English / German dictionary he had.

                            The amount of food in the loadout is high because the units travel on foot in sparsely inhabited areas, with limited logistical support.

                          • #72966
                            Corvette
                            Participant

                              http://guerrillamerica.com/2014/05/exsum-14-may-14/

                              Here’s the link to the EXSUM where I write about some intelligence and security aspects plucked from the article. If we sat down and really dissected it, I’m sure we could glean even more information. Such is the case by giving any information at all.

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