Dehydrating Food for Field Rations and Preparedness

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    • #90391
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        If you have become a Rationalist that truly believes in preparedness and training for hard times you have discovered it is a huge undertaking.

        Even if you have a unlimited budget much of this still needs to learned since sooner or later the cupboard will become empty.

        Whether you grow your own food or barter for it post-event you will need to develop storage options.

        Canning is an option, but some foods are better tasting through dehydrating.

        Weight and fragile glassware of traditional canning is not conducive to take on patrols, not to mention taking to market once trade is reestablished.

        I am not going to get too in-depth on how to dehydrate food since there are many sites available online for this.

        Through sweat equity you can stretch your budget and have more funds available for training in things that require professional instruction.

        All the modern dehydrators I have were acquired at yard sales and flea markets for pennies on the dollar. Including a vacuum food saver which has many uses for preparedness.

        Here is a link to a Backwoods Home Magazine (highly recommended) article on a “Build a passive-solarfood dehydrator By Jeffrey Yago, P.E., CEM.”

        Dehydrated food makes excellent ingredients for my favorite method of cooking on the move “Thermos Cooking.”

      • #90392
        Max
        Keymaster

          Note: This is not Max’s Post, but a glitch from previous Forum change.

          yes, one thing to remember is any dehydrated food when eaten or prepared will need to be hydrated. keep that in mind for your water consumption or supply. other things i can recommend and have used is LDS bishop house online 7mil (very strong) Mylar pouches link plus their Oxy Absorbers link2 I also like the vaccum sealers for Mason Jars both wide and small mouth link3 I have used and still use every one of these products with no fails for 4 years.

        • #90393
          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
          Moderator

            I highly recommend learning to make your own dehydrated foods and rations to provide long term self sufficiency.

            If you want to purchase high quality dehydrated foods I recommend Walton Feed’s Rainy Day Foods.

            From their site:

            Walton Feed has been in business for over 50 years. Walton Feed has been known throughout the United States and abroad for its certified high protein wheat. Rainy Day Foods, a division of Walton Feed, has now become known for providing dehydrated and freeze-dried food storage as well. Walton Feed continues to research and experiment with the technology needed to improve short and long-term storage and preservation. We at Walton Feed / Rainy Day Foods are committed to offering our customers the highest quality of edible grains, dehydrated imitation meats, vegetables, fruits and freeze dried products available as well as items used for storing these products and other emergency supplies. Whether you are looking for food products for meals that can be prepared quickly and easily or you prefer to prepare your meals from scratch using your favorite basic ingredients, Walton Feed can fill your needs.

            Walton Feed Inc. is a privately owned corporation with its main office and store located in Montpelier, Idaho. In addition to home food storage sold under the Rainy Day Foods label, Walton Feed also sells animal feed and farming and ranching supplies. Walton Feed has an additional facility located in Cache Junction, Utah, known as Walton Feed West, that specializes in animal feed and mineral blocks.

            I have been using Walton Feed for over 30 years. Their products are available in #10 cans, 6 gallon buckets (Regular bucket (RB) are sealed inside the bucket with the oxygen absorber. The Super pail (SP) has the extra mylar lining), and bulk bags to be divided up as you see fit.

            Check out their website.

            Additionally the following Link is via the WayBack Machine (Internet Archive) http://www.waltonfeed.com has many older information pages such as Walton’s Self Reliance PagesAnd Information Area. Of particular interest is the The Old Timer PageThe Way We Used To Do it…

            Also they have a Shipping with group and pool truck, by utilizing this option you can save much money on shipping. I have used this many times over the years in many places around the Country. This can also possibly lead to meeting people who are of like mind.

          • #90394
            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
            Moderator

              one thing to remember is any dehydrated food when eaten or prepared will need to be hydrated. keep that in mind for your water consumption or supply.

              Agreed, your AO can be a factor although I will point out that even in a desert whether you pack the water or pack the water and say MRE’s, the weight is pretty much constant.

              For those of us with easy resupply of water we can save considerable weight carrying dehydrated foods.

            • #90395
              Roadkill
              Participant

                If you had deep pockets or six or eight families going in you could also purchase a freze dryer. A freeze dryer can put your food into the 25 year stable period. You can also freeze dry many things you can’t dehydrate.

              • #90396
                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                Moderator

                  A freeze dryer can put your food into the 25 year stable period.

                  True, if all you want to do is build a supply of food to keep in the basement.

                  A better option for me is to utilize dehydrated food into my normal diet.

                  Over a little time this will easily get you into significant period of stored food, as in a few years worth of staples stored properly which is constantly rotated through use.

                  This combined with store purchased canned goods as well as kitchen items canned at home provides a variety of items to diversify your storage program.

                  This also eliminates much of the transition problems associated with a sudden jump to stored food during an event.

                  For me it’s about a preparedness lifestyle vs just having stored food/gear available.

                • #90397
                  Roadkill
                  Participant

                    G.W.N.S. I’m doing exactly what you are. My pockets seem to be a little shallow these days.

                  • #90398
                    Max
                    Keymaster

                      Note: This is not Max’s Post, but a glitch from previous Forum change.

                      i tend to store long term foods that i can not grow/access too (i do not own a salt mine) or that i can grow but energy/time vs store bought is a no brainer; so long as i still trust vendors for organic/non gmo. i have plans/goal to build a outdooor dehydrator this year. mother earth news had a pretty good tower design. “This also eliminates much of the transition problems associated with a sudden jump to stored food during an event.” i agree 100% and it is just flat out better for you.

                    • #90399
                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                      Moderator

                        (i do not own a salt mine)

                        That was one of Florida’s biggest contributions to the Confederacy was in producing salt.

                        Floridian salt plants worked 24 hours a day boiling salt from sea water, mostly in the area between Saint Andrews Bay and St. Marks, Florida. Occasionally, Union forces came ashore just to destroy the boilers. Confederate law made those involved in salt-making immune to being drafted, making it a popular profession in war-time Florida.


                        Confederate salt kettle which could make 150 bushels of salt a day.

                      • #90400
                        jane
                        Participant

                          I do a lot of dehydrating because I have a big garden, and don’t have the freezer space to store it (freezers full of wild game). I use a 9-tray Excalibur, vacuum pack w/ O2 absorbers then pack in mylar bags. I use the freeze dried veggies in soups and stews throughout the year.

                          If you want to pack ready made meals, mix freeze dried veggies with seasoning to your liking, put in a big dollop of coconut oil (your main calorie source, 5 yr shelf life) and vacuum pack. You can also add freeze dried meats. Of course, you will need to rehydrate when you cook it.

                        • #90401
                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                          Moderator

                            I primarily use dehydrated vice freeze dried for the lower cost. Not to mention it is what I can readily replace myself.

                            Preparation of dehydrated takes longer than freeze dried, but by using thermos cooking it really doesn’t matter for field use since I am preparing my next meal while while enjoying current one.

                          • #90402
                            Keeper
                            Participant

                              to your liking, put in a big dollop of coconut oil (your main calorie source, 5 yr shelf life) and vacuum pack.

                              won’t the coconut oil go bad ?

                            • #90403
                              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                              Moderator

                                Another overdue for a bump Thread.

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