Camo by Dan Morgan

View Latest Activity

Viewing 8 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #62927
      RRS
      Participant

        I don’t know the policy on cross posting, but I will leave this here. Mr. Morgan adds some points on camo I had not heard of before.

        In the comments someone brings up the topic of wool clothing, I have it in my mind that wool combat clothing might be a seller.

        Camouflage 101

      • #62928
        Brian from Georgia
        Participant

          That was a pretty good read. I’ve been enjoying his patrol fiction story.

        • #62929
          DiznNC
          Participant

            Good article. Dan Morgan is a solid ex-SF dude.

            There are a couple of points I don’t agree on though. I have always liked using a different color top from my trou, especially in transition areas. The first use I saw of it was Norwegian snow troops using white trou with forest green parkas. Very effective in that environment. Also works really well in semi-arid areas, where you have large open stretches of sand colored earth, interspersed with green scrub brush. So I don’t agree with his comment of don’t use contrasting tops and bottoms. Depends on terrain.

            Also do not agree that solid earth tone colors are not very effective. He seems to favor camo-patterned clothing, which is good, but I think solid colored clothing is more effective than he gives it credit for. Again depends on terrain.

          • #62930
            RRS
            Participant

              I was going to ask you about that mix of camo, I remember you speaking of it earlier. My BOL is certainly arid tank country I think your idea will work well. Got to work on my Marpat collection I think

            • #62931
              trailman
              Participant

                Also do not agree that solid earth tone colors are not very effective. He seems to favor camo-patterned clothing, which is good, but I think solid colored clothing is more effective than he gives it credit for. Again depends on terrain.

                I’m on board with that. Long time ago I looked into painting a duckboat. The intricate camo patterns were and still are all the rage. However when you get back at a distance all the intricate patterns meld together into a blob. Just a big dark patch with the outline of a boat. That looking led me to an article on how they camo’ed WWII ships with large contrasting patterns, it effectively breaks up your silhouette at any distance.

              • #62932
                DiznNC
                Participant

                  Yeah I mean what he’s saying about camo clothing is spot on, IF you are in triple canopy jungle or deep woodlands. Then you want something matching all over to blend in. But when you are in these transitions areas, i.e. between deep bush and open country it’s a different story. When there is a definite visual difference between the ground and the surrounding foliage, it sometimes makes sense to blend your legs into the ground color and your torso into the bush color. Case in point, in mountain terrain you frequently have snow on the ground but green trees. Using snow overwhites on your legs with a camo parka works very well. You now resemble a 3′ scrub pine instead of a human shape. Same with arid areas. Some kind of desert trou with a woodland camo top is very effective. Makes you look like a 3′ scrub bush.

                  I don’t know if this makes any difference but NSW and Marine recon used to split DCU and woodland camo all the time. See “Lone Survivor”. Some times you get these inter-service things. Don’t know if that’s the case here, but it exists.

                • #62933
                  RRS
                  Participant

                    How would trousers in ATAC AU fit with the mix and match in a transition zone? Propper makes them, don’t know the quality though.

                  • #62934
                    marketgarden
                    Participant

                      That looking led me to an article on how they camo’ed WWII ships with large contrasting patterns, it effectively breaks up your silhouette at any distance.

                      Trailman, I think that’s the right idea. It doesn’t hurt to have fine-grained patterns within larger colored blocks, but using large color blocks helps break up the shape. For a human shape, breaking up the left/right symmetry and the top/bottom “human” shape will make you blend in better.

                      For example, take this photo of a timber rattler. Even though its camouflage is basically just two colors–one of which is significantly darker than the leaf background–it very effectively breaks up the snake’s shape. The eye does not easily resolve either a long skinny “snake” shape or a round “coiled snake” shape. It’s all-to-easy to skim your eyes over this and think “no threat”.

                      It’s fascinating and educational to see how effectively animals are camouflaged with relatively simple patterns using colors that are mostly shades of gray and brown.

                    • #62935
                      marketgarden
                      Participant

                        Observing the thumbnail pic attached to the above post helps highlight the whole point of that post. Even though maybe 40-50% of the pixels in that image are of “snake”, when viewed at a distance–as that thumbnail looks at normal viewing distance on the screen–I couldn’t begin to identify it as a snake if I didn’t already know it was there.

                    Viewing 8 reply threads
                    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.