bicycle mobility and function

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    • #72918
      Justin
      Participant

        Thoughts? Ideas? Usefulness?

      • #72919
        JohnyMac
        Participant

          Justin, I do not buy their qty’s.

          For example, I don’t know anybody who drinks 3 gallons of water a day. A gallon of water = 8 lbs. The average male 180-200 lbs in moderate weather conditions, walking with a 25 lb ruck, for 5 or so hours total, should drink about 1 gallon of water a day. This number is of course augmented by what you eat, e.g. fruit has water in it, potato chips do not.

          Horses do not drink 150 lbs of water or 19 gallons a day. A horse that is not working but frolicking in a field of clover will drink 5 gallons or so of water a day. On the move, like elk hunting; probably double that. Keep in mind they will be eating foraged food like grass which has water. If you only fed them hay as in the winter, I am sure their H20 intake would increase. As would a horse that receives a lot of grain.

        • #72920
          Justin
          Participant

            Oh I have no doubt that their numbers are skewed to promote bicicles But I think that I the rift circumstances they a utility on partisan battlefield. There was a bicicle unit here in Montana before ww2 I think that rode the single speed hard tail across the state.

          • #72921
            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
            Moderator

              Regardless of that information I believe bicycles to be a great addition to anyone’s transportation options.

              They are great exercise that I consider recreation. I can carry more weight both faster and for considerably longer distance.

              I have done both long distance hiking and long distance cycling.

              I have averaged about 16 mile days hiking for weeks at a time. My best recreational single day distance was just over 23 miles. I have found that if I do three 20 mile plus days in a row, I benefit greatly from a day of rest before resuming normal pace.

              Cycling I can easily do five 100 mile days, before needing a day of rest. 75 mile days are relatively easy for weeks at a time.

              I do take about two to three months of increased training before starting these trips.

              I can travel a little over four times the distance a day cycling than hiking. Admittedly this is under normal conditions, not SHTF.

              I have a trailer that I can carry 200 lbs for a loss of about 3 miles an hour in average speed (note: this is in relatively flat Florida). I wouldn’t try that much weight in hills/mountains with out peddle assist.

              The VC in Vietnam demonstrated that bicycles carrying gear as you walk bike is also an option.

              In an extreme threat scenario I would rather go on foot for security reasons.

              YMMV
              :-)

            • #72922
              Max
              Keymaster

                (Reply not by Max, by deleted user)

                Timely, as I’m about to embark on setting up my mountain bike for more cargo capability.

                Any recommendations on a simple, robust, and not so expensive rear rack? (I figure I’ll just get a rack, lash things to it as needed, and not go the pannier route).

                I also may use a modified kiddy trailer, but the rack seems to be a no brainer for a basic set up.

                Keep your powder dry,
                Atlas Shrug

              • #72923
                Max
                Keymaster

                  (Reply not by Max, by deleted user)

                  Hey Atlas,

                  Xtracycle Freeradical X1 get 2 out of 3 simple and robust. Not so expensive? Well it depends.

                  http://www.xtracycle.com/freeradical

                  http://www.biketrailershop.com/xtracycle-kits-c-230.html

                  These guys have the Xtracycle stuff and also carry a large number of trailers. Lowering C.of G. of bicycle and gear is always a good thing. FWIW.

                  Joe

                • #72924
                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                  Moderator

                    Any recommendations on a simple, robust, and not so expensive rear rack? (I figure I’ll just get a rack, lash things to it as needed, and not go the pannier route).

                    I also may use a modified kiddy trailer, but the rack seems to be a no brainer for a basic set up.

                    How much weight do you anticipate and what type of Bicycle do you have? What is your height and weight?

                    There are many options, some reasonable, some not so!

                  • #72925
                    Max
                    Keymaster

                      (Reply not by Max, by deleted user)

                      I always wanted a Swiss military bike, until I saw the prices. As I looked at them, it would be hard to get parts as well. I think a solid mountain bike with trailer would be great. My wife is excited: She loves to bike so we can do that together. I hate it, but need an alternative to walking. I recall reading porters on the Ho Chi Minh trail could move up to 150 pounds by walking along pushing the bike.

                      Also, I think that three gallons of water includes personal hygiene.

                    • #72926
                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                      Moderator

                        Something I just thought of when cargo biking, appearances.

                        I have done many long distance rides; if you want to avoid LEO hassles, wear a quality proper fitting bicycle helmet and perhaps a bicycle moisture wicking shirt (they can be had in more subdued colors).

                        Why? Well there are many homeless people riding Bikes w/trailers or carrying loads. If you look more like a cyclist Touring you get a friendly wave as you cycle on by, if you resemble the homeless you attract their attention.

                        Is it right? No, but just reality today.

                      • #72927
                        JohnyMac
                        Participant

                          GWNS wrote:
                          The VC in Vietnam demonstrated that bicycles carrying gear as you walk bike is also an option.

                          Yupper! GWNS there were actually companies of women that used bicycles to deliver supplies during the “American War.”

                          As you stated a bike would be loaded up and walked down a trail by a VC woman. Then the woman would ride their bike back; Many times through US lines, to base to reload and do it all over again.

                          Personally, I would rather use a horse or better yet a mule. I don’t look good in spandex. ;-)

                        • #72928
                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                          Moderator

                            Here is something you don’t see every day!

                            :-)

                          • #72929
                            Yankee Terrier
                            Participant

                              The VC and the NVA (North Viet not East Ger.) both used bicycles being walked to move large amounts of Supplies, etc…And even more telling was the Japanese movement down the Malay peninsula in late 1941 early 1942 resulting in the fall of the British garrison in Singapore. The average Japanese soldier was moving 200 lbs of kit and supplies by walking a bike. His adversary in the Australian Imperial Force was maxed out at about 70lbs in the equatorial heat. A swiss philosophy bike is a great tool.

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