Always Ready or Last Minute Preparation?

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    • #90438
      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
      Moderator

        Well here in the Southeast we have Tropical Storm Collin, not too big of deal relatively speaking, but enough to cause power outages and general damage.

        Do you have what you need for short term disruptions or do you need to go shopping?

        Have a generator? When is the last time you checked it’s function?

        Do you rotate fuel storage for it so there is no need to venture out to get fuel last minute?

        How about food?

        Do yo have a barometer and the knowledge to observe the barometric tendencies combined with general WX knowledge?

        By observing the winds, barometer, and type of clouds you don’t need to rely on just the WX channel to know when it’s time to secure your area.

        Do you have the ability to receive WX satellite data direct from orbit? Do you realize that in many scenarios this data will still be available “Post-Event” regardless if things breakdown here?

        Alternative communication?

        If you have family at home and you are away is there a checklist available for them to easily know what to do (good idea even if you are home)?

        Just some basic observations.

      • #90439
        whitebear620
        Participant

          We’re getting lots of rain here in my area even though Colin hasn’t hit us yet. Enough for people to be stupid, but not enough for the county to shut down.
          We have most of what we need short term, a few holes in my preparations that I have no excuse for.
          No generator, we live in an apartment so it’s not an option due to space/lease.
          Need to get more fuel for the camping stove.
          Never even thought about getting a barometer, which is stupid of me, I’ll have to get one.
          No alternative communication, but everyone else in the family has enough to get through the storm, runs can be made to nearby family if they need things the day after (multiple ways to go in case of road blockages). Still would be wonderful if I could get everyone set up with a radio.
          No checklist at home because it’s just the wife and I. Checklist would literally be grab the lantern, sit it out.
          Like I said, I’ve noticed holes in my preps that I need to fix yesterday. But I’m plenty prepared for something like Colin.

        • #90440
          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
          Moderator

            We have most of what we need short term, a few holes in my preparations that I have no excuse for.

            Well don’t be too hard on yourself, these little “events” can be of great help identifying holes.

            No generator, we live in an apartment so it’s not an option due to space/lease.

            In the past when in similar housing situations I’ve had a couple of deep cycle batteries that I kept charged mainly to keep electronics charged and operational, add even cheap solar panel or two to help in a longer situation. Not a perfect solution, but helpful.

            Like I said, I’ve noticed holes in my preps that I need to fix yesterday. But I’m plenty prepared for something like Colin.

            :good:

          • #90441
            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
            Moderator

              A chainsaw is very handy when trees start dropping.

              Appropriately sized tarp/s and rope can be helpful for temporary roof repairs etc…

            • #90442
              Roadkill
              Participant

                For chainsaws and small engines, especially two stroke make sure you use RV fuel. It’s usually around 92 octain and has no ethanol. Ethanol will destroy your small motors. If you have no choice on fuel get the marine grade stable. This helps neutralize the ethanol.

              • #90443
                Robert
                Participant

                  I guess we haven’t had all the issues with ethanol in gas cause we treat with PRI-G.

                • #90444
                  Anonymous
                  Inactive

                    We don’t have a generator yet, I would like to get one eventually. If I had a lot of money to spend I’d invest in solar so I could be more self-sufficient even when there isn’t a hurricane blowing through town. I do have a little car battery charger, it has a car outlet so I can at least charge cell phones and the like, if I use an inverter I could probably run household stuff too, though I’m not sure for how long.

                    We have an okay little stockpile of canned food, I’ve also been buying some Mountain House freeze-dried food here and there during my trips to Wal-Mart. We have a large pile of firewood and a charcoal grill so cooking isn’t out of the question. I’d like to get some cast iron pans and whatnot so I can cook over a fire. I also like the Gosner’s ultra-pasteurized milk, that’s good to store at room temperature for a year (before opening, of course) and I can find it at Dollar Tree. (Though if anyone knows where it’s cheaper in bulk, hook a brother up and let me know where lol.)

                    We had a nasty little derecho storm pass through the Mid-Atlantic about four years ago which knocked out our power for almost a week. Seeing how helpless I was without power that long got me to take prepping more seriously.

                    I have myself a little stockpile of electric lanterns and candles, I want to get some kerosene lanterns going as well. There’s a neat little Mom and Pop magazine we get at my job called Backwoodsman, the latest issue has instructions for making cooking oil lanterns; coincidentally, I’ve been frying a lot of food lately. (Backwoodsman also had instructions for using solar panels and the battery chargers from Harbor Freight a few issues back as an ad hoc portable solar generator for camping or power outages.)

                    I should probably try to figure out how to store fuel eventually so I can beat the rush when storm season does roll around, at the moment I don’t really have the space to stockpile fuel though.

                  • #90445
                    Mike Q
                    Participant

                      Rampantraptor:

                      I do not have a generator myself. However I have a secondary plan which I’ve tested and works well. I have several inverters I can hook up to each of my vehicles. After all I have two $25k generators sitting in the driveway already… I have a 400 watt, several 800 watt, and a 1200 watt inverters. One of my refrigerators, and one freezer can each be run off each of the 800 watt inverters. This keeps my food cold throughout a summer outage, and a grille with over 5 tanks of propane will get me through several weeks of cooking if necessary. If the outage is through the winter then one of the car inverters can be dedicated for entertainment system for the wife and kids, and the other for the in house refrigerator. Besides your car engine is a hell of a lot more efficient than a generator. The only downside to not having the generator is that I cannot pull the massive watts a decent sized generator can put out. But nothing I have requires large amounts of power except my A/C and no generator out there except a full house genset will do that anyway.

                      I also keep 12 – 5 gallon gas cans stored in my backyard as well. One for every month of the year. I bought and filled them up the 1st day of each month last year and put a bit of stabilizer in each can. Each can is labeled 1-12 for January through December. This year whenever I get low on gas in my vehicle I take the appropriate gas can, dump it in my car, then refill the gas can and car. Thereby all of my gas is rotated and no more then a year old. Thereby my only outlay in cost is the gas cans themselves since I use the fuel within a year anyway.

                    • #90446
                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                      Moderator

                        This year whenever I get low on gas in my vehicle I take the appropriate gas can, dump it in my car, then refill the gas can and car. Thereby all of my gas is rotated and no more then a year old.

                        :good:

                        Generators have there benefits, but mostly as a short term solution.

                        Even the most rudimentary solar set up will be a better choice though small systems will be more about keeping your electronics and rechargeable batteries in a state of readiness.

                        …solar panels and the battery chargers from Harbor Freight a few issues back as an ad hoc portable solar generator for camping or power outages.

                        With a little research and an eye out for sales you could build a more durable system with more output.

                        Now is the time to figure out what your minimum system needs are, it is difficult to truly get a handle on just how much you need without practical use.

                      • #90447
                        D Close
                        Moderator

                          Always ready…somewhat. Based on earlier posts on this Forun I purchased a 45W solar system with two 35 ahr lead acid batteries. I recently purchased an additional two marine type batteries for backup power that are charged off the house system or generator. They could also be charged off the solar. I use the solar system to charge my portable devices and radios on a daily basis. Doing this I know they are working.

                          I have a backup 50W panel in case my main panel is damaged. I need a better backup charge controller for the batteries. For comms, my home CB station is powered off the batteries normally. A Yaesu 817ND HF/VHF/UHF has it’s own battery pack but I ususally run it off a portable 12V car jumper device that has a receptical built in. Another thing to do is inventory the electrical loads so I can better estimate run times. I have some DC powered lights that work off the solar system as well. I would highly recommend getting some good Powerpole connectors to use with various power sources to power your critical equipment. Spare fuses for all is what I need to work on.
                          For roof damage, I have stored tarps, plywood and shoring beams off site as I do not have lots of room on my property. Virginia sees it’s share of hurricanes. The trees are most vulnerable and my biggest concern.

                        • #90448
                          Roadkill
                          Participant

                            PRI-G is probably the best gas preserver available they also make a diesel preserver. Still ethanol is bad. I’ve seized up a Husky 395 chainsaw 3 times until we figured ethanol was wreaking havoc with the seals. Does PRI-G counteract ethanol?

                          • #90449
                            Corvette
                            Participant

                              We are lucky here as far as fuel, living in a rural farming community. All the gas stations in the area have 100% non-ethanol gas. We have a generator, fuel, and a large cowboy grill that we can cook on with wood. Putting a wood stove in the house next project. We have a years supply of food, and grow a lot of our own. Also getting solar panels as a longer term solution, including a solar powered well pump.

                            • #90450
                              trailman
                              Participant

                                I love threads like this It’s good to see other people’s ideas. It makes me think and keep motivated.

                                Power
                                When Sandy hit we were without power for about seven days. We have a Honda 5500 genset that we ran all the needed items off of for the week. Only major problem was a dead sump pump at the beginning of the storm and that was fixed by the last one at HD. That’s a whole story over beers.

                                We did some renovations the following spring that required electrical work and took the opportunity to install a panel transfer switch for the genset. We used on like this vs the one that taps off. With a load center one you can mix and match any thing you need as long as you don’t overload the genset. I love it because I’m not restricted to a few circuits,.

                                http://www.gordonelectricsupply.com/index~text~5715125~path~product~part~5715125~ds~dept~process~search?gclid=Cj0KEQjwhN-6BRCJsePgxru9iIwBEiQAI8rq8xqpup_izoRalN-a67bl-ZxNIQS_T-m6-tDbghbo7xMaAjV38P8HAQ

                                Mike I’m into your idea about the invertors and we have one or two for emergencies too but I need a genny to run our well. Also a note that most higher power inverters in my experience have to clip to the battery terminals or they will blow the power socket fuse.

                                We keep about 25 gallons of gas on hand at any time for the mower etc and that goes towards the genny if I need it. I think I’m going to steal your idea and program on the 12 cans though.

                                Couple things to remember about the genny if you are thinking about it. From the electrician that did our work. He’d gladly install a whole house set for ya but no one needs one, people scale them to handle all the power in the house but no one every turns on every light and all the outlets. Its nice to have it kick on automatically but most of us can handle hooking one up and firing it when needed. Also you can’t take it with you. Mines on wheels, up in the truck and gone. Cable locked to the deck when out and running.

                                If I did anything different I would have got a diesel one since I have a tank on the property.

                                I’ve looked at solar from time to time and need to get more educated on it. I have a few deep cycles but need to work out a system. I know from professional experience with UPS’s that batteries are the key and the expense. I have a few just need to get a solar panel and regulator. Maybe this year. Esp for the HAM stuff now.

                                Cooking/Heat
                                We have a wood stove and that takes care of the house for heat and it has a cook top. Our furnace is propane if we need it, it can run off the genny but we never use it. One camp chef stove and two propane Coleman’s with 16 20# propane tanks in the shed. (Look on freecycle). Plus a fire pit etc etc. Also our back room has a Jotul propane stove for heat that we just leave a big pot of water on to keep heated.

                                Water/sanitation.
                                We have the well and a creek on property. I have basic filtering equipment and we stock bleach if needed for the big blue drums. Looked at a Simple Pump at one time to slave down our current well but haven’t pulled the trigger on it. Ideally we plan on dropping another well and putting a pump on it like at MVT. Mainly for the animals but also for us.

                                Septic with a sand mound, pump chamber is way downhill and mound is like 200 yards past that . Pump chamber has over flown with power outages and it doesn’t really bother anything. We keep milk jugs handy for flush water.

                                Food
                                We stock a bit of food, its one thing we can do better at though. Can’t have too much food put away. Something to think about is canning meat. It’s stupid easy in a pressure canner and last a long time on the shelf. Now we are not talking bug out shit here but basic home prep storage. I can a lot of our deer meat. I could go one about that.

                                Weather
                                That’s a tough one, I can read a few signs but my local location is up against the mountain to the west and all our weather comes from that direction. My LOS is about 45 degrees over that thing. We know it’s going to rain basically when it starts raining. A barometer would be nice to have.

                                Comms
                                Cell of course. We have always kept a landline since those are self powered. HAM, FRS/GMRS. A crank powered radio. Verizon MiFi.

                                Checklist
                                Need to work on that. I have one for the genny plus all the critical breakers are marked. Sump. Fridge etc. We need to work up a storm list. Worked off the top of the head for the blizzard this year and should have written it down.

                                Engine day
                                I have an engine day on the calendar. Besides using stabil in all the gas, the first of the month I get a reminder. Heartworm and tick stuff for the dogs and I fire up everything I own for about 15 minutes, weed whacker, saw, genny, mower, zero turn, tractor. Even if I used it the day before. Gets a little noisy but no one care out here.

                                Cast Iron
                                Got a ton, really started back into that with scouts. Piece of advice, Friday go to the bank and get $50 in fives and $50 in ones. Saturday morning hit the yard sales in the older neighborhoods. Cast iron and hand tools gold mine. I got an essentially brand new brace and set of 15 bits from a gentleman for $4. He was ecstatic that I even knew what it was called.

                                Oil/Kerosene Lamps
                                Are cool, we have some. One Dietz and a bunch of glass hurricanes (Yard Sales/ Freecycle). Tip: hit Wal-Mart in the early spring and buy the Kleenclear when they red tag it. It doesn’t stink as much if you are sensitive to that. Also for the lamps look for the ones with wide flat bases. They are more stable and the fuel doesn’t have to wick up as far to burn. And finally keep the kero in a kero can or metal can, fill the lamp when you need it and drain it when done. The fuel will evaporate out of the lamp over time.

                                Overall. Our preps are more gearing towards a weeklong event than “I lost power last night because of the storm”. Sandy was a week down. The ice storm the following year was a five day outage, worked through that fine. This years blizzard was a non-issue. Never had to leave the house for three days except to plow and shovel

                              • #90451
                                Mike Q
                                Participant

                                  Trailman:
                                  I’m with you on the genny for the well. Most wells I know of are 220 and you ain’t getting that with an inverter. I don’t have a well, but I have a flowing creek year round 60 feet from my house. So water usage will just have to be filtered through my home made Berkey. But the point we are both trying to make is to adjust and prepare for your individual situation.

                                  Also all of my inverters are clip onto the battery type. The cigarette outlet on a car is only 120 watts anyway, so you’ll never get more than that out of them.

                                  I was one of those weird guys hoping we’d lose power during that 40″ snowfall in January so I’d get to try out everything I had. That was until I went out midday on Saturday and saw 6′ tall snow drifts on my roof!

                                  congrats on how much you have ready now. It’s much more than 99.9% of the people I know.

                                • #90452
                                  trailman
                                  Participant

                                    Trailman:
                                    I was one of those weird guys hoping we’d lose power during that 40″ snowfall in January so I’d get to try out everything I had. That was until I went out midday on Saturday and saw 6′ tall snow drifts on my roof!

                                    I’m there with you. We were pretty set.

                                  • #90453
                                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                    Moderator

                                      I love threads like this It’s good to see other people’s ideas. It makes me think and keep motivated.

                                      I had hoped things would build on each others posts.

                                      Also a note that most higher power inverters in my experience have to clip to the battery terminals or they will blow the power socket fuse.

                                      Yea, my 1500W requires a minimum of 2awg cable so it definitely isn’t a even a clip on option. Keep good ventilation and keep inverter fans clean, heat is there biggest enemy.

                                    • #90454
                                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                      Moderator

                                        Depending on your level of preparedness and threats here is something many don’t consider until too late.


                                        The above is an example and not an endorsement of this particular unit.

                                        I live in a rural setting with VFD available during normal times. The VFD has a pretty good record of response, but could easily be overwhelmed in major disaster, not to mention “Post-Event.”

                                        The above video depicts a prepackaged setup, you can also assemble your own system (what I did). Your water source can be pool, pond, or storage tank (either mobile, static, or both). If you have no firefighting experience you can get it either through VFD or some vocational schools.

                                        I have a 5000 gallon water tank and a 1500 gallon trailer mounted tank. Research carefully if you consider this type of equipment also don’t overestimate water availability. The 5000 gallon tank will provide about 45 minutes of water with my setup.

                                      • #90455
                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                        Moderator

                                          Well with Hurricane Matthew a possible threat to the Southeast seems like a good time to refresh this Thread.

                                          Consider your current preparedness level and any gaps that need addressing.

                                        • #90456
                                          Corvette
                                          Participant

                                            I’m hoping we get rain out of it here in E. TN. Been mighty dry this year. Our creek, which has always been full of water year round, is now dry.

                                          • #90457
                                            SeanT
                                            Keymaster

                                              Reports out of SC are that fuel stations are running dry due to Evacs. These folks that tanked up to cruise out are going to need a refill soon so y’all ought to tank up if you are in the east.

                                            • #90458
                                              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                              Moderator

                                                Isn’t that a special Skull! :yes:

                                                Definitely nice to be prepared in advance, no lines, shortages, or scared people.

                                                I can’t even imagine what its like to be one of these wait to the last minute types.

                                              • #90459
                                                xsquidgator
                                                Participant

                                                  Here in Orlando, the weirdness is starting. Most gas stations are out, and people are starting to act odd now that the storm will be here tomorrow night. The word is that the roads in from the coast are “bad” chock-a-block with people evacuating.
                                                  My work is closing at noon tomorrow and we are closed Friday, too. Isn’t it funny how if, 40 years ago, you’d asked me how I’d feel about getting Thursday afternoon and all of Friday off, I’d have said “sign me up” for some of that. Now, though, I’m mostly thinking about homeowner’s insurance deductibles and wondering about how to get all the breakable stuff inside or under cover.

                                                  One thing I hadn’t thought of until now: I always counted on my amateur radio base station as backup comms. But, I have to take the roof-mounted antenna down tonight so won’t have it available until after the storm passes us sometime on Friday. I hadn’t thought of having to take the antenna down before.

                                                • #90460
                                                  TC
                                                  Participant

                                                    Here in Boca Raton the weirdness started 2-3 days ago. It’s 36 hours from impact and I went out to survey the state of things and see how the last minute preppers were doing. All five gas stations out of gas yet dozens of cars still lined up trying to get in. Grocery parking lots jammed to near capacity, shelves cleared of water and canned goods. Water / ice / gasoline / propane first to go, as we all know. People were driving carelessly, not paying attention, obviously distracted and preoccupied. Saw the same thing with Francis in 2004. Looks like 4 days minimum pre-ETA is needed to beat the crowd with respect to gas, water, and evacuations for this kind of thing.

                                                    EDIT: I forgot to order a 12V AC inverter after the previous one died a few months ago. Only realized that earlier today. I have a UPS power supply that can be rigged up with the larger battery and solar panel on hand, but still. That was an oversight, and underscores the importance of being detail oriented because it’s the wrong little things that can end up getting you.

                                                  • #90461
                                                    SeanT
                                                    Keymaster

                                                      Here in Orlando,
                                                      One thing I hadn’t thought of until now: I always counted on my amateur radio base station as backup comms. But, I have to take the roof-mounted antenna down tonight so won’t have it available until after the storm passes us sometime on Friday. I hadn’t thought of having to take the antenna down before.

                                                      an HF antenna?

                                                      this is where having a portable dipole precut and tested is super handy. a magmount for uhf/vhf can be stuck to a cookie sheet in a pinch too. lots of solutions if you have the time to work them. Good luck and BE CAREFUL on the roof!!!!!!

                                                    • #90462
                                                      Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                      Moderator

                                                        weirdness

                                                        weirdness

                                                        Good word for it! :yes:

                                                        Definitely gives a brief insight to how people react.

                                                        I have to take the roof-mounted antenna down tonight so won’t have it available until after the storm passes…

                                                        It’s great to have such warning to do these things, imagine trying to track something like this with just radio reports from other amateurs.

                                                        Things to remember if possible:

                                                        Are vehicles in a safe place (trees. powerlines, etc…)?

                                                        Self rescue gear, such as ropes, shoring, chain saws, crowbars, sledgehammers, fire extinguishers, jacks, picks and shovels prepositioned and free of dangers?

                                                        Temporary repair materials such as plywood, tarps, Furring Strips, nails/screws, and tools?

                                                        Have you spread the wealth (preps) to prevent losing all in the event of collapse of one part of dwelling/storage?

                                                        Just a few thoughts, since we could write a book on it.

                                                        Probably never need it, but… ;-)

                                                      • #90463
                                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                        Moderator

                                                          BE CAREFUL on the roof!!!!!!

                                                          Excellent point! Many get hurt both Pre/Post from not being extra cautious. Not the time to dealing with injuries.

                                                          Getting injured just as an “Event” happens would really strain your preparedness.

                                                        • #90464
                                                          xsquidgator
                                                          Participant

                                                            The roof antenna I was talking about is a UHF/VHF J-pole. I appreciate the reminders to be careful, as 10 years ago I did fall off the same roof putting up Christmas lights and that sucked. You’re right, this would be a particularly bad time to break a bone or something.
                                                            I can set up the j-pole up high for radio comms over Orange and Seminole Counties here, and my local friends and I have practiced our simplex VHF enough times to be sure it will work (simplex = radio-to-radio, not using repeaters or other outside infrastructure)

                                                            If I get time I may put up one of the HF antennas and see if I can reach DennisW again- he’s 200 miles north of me and we have been able to talk on HF before. Hopefully we won’t be too crazy busy after the storm and there’ll be time and energy left over to do that.

                                                            “My advice to you is to start drinking heavily” (once the yard furniture and missile hazards are stowed away)

                                                          • #90465
                                                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                            Moderator

                                                              My local gas station still had fuel of all flavors, thought the most common thing I heard while getting a soda fountain refill was “I can’t believe they still have fuel.”

                                                              I heard most of the stations in surrounding communities have either run out with a few with premium only (though most still had diesel).

                                                              The cashiers were particularly stressed between being busy and credit/debit card processing failures and the EBT was down.

                                                              Cash is King in an emergency! ;-)

                                                              Traffic is much heavier than the norm for my area.

                                                            • #90466
                                                              HiDesertRat
                                                              Participant

                                                                Your thoughts in the intro about barometer and WX struck a nerve. Ever since moving to NV years ago, then ID, have never been attuned to the weather in my life as I am now. In 15 minutes the weather can change on a dime. And not talking sunny to rain but sunny to 60 mph winds and your backyard looks like a garage sale, snow, hail, you name it. Always looking at the sky, but barometer sounds like good idea. WX/satellite transmissions will require more work on my part. Got the chain saw, axes, wood stove, solar ready to put up, etc. Comm stuff is a headache that takes effort to learn, but very crucial. Also cultivating local solutions rather than amazon, gov’t etc. All takes time, energy, and people skills. The juggernaut is coming, the system is flailing, the people in charge are incompetent or don’t give a fuck. Just look at your circumstances and live life because you can’t change what is about to happen, so get ready.

                                                              • #90467
                                                                Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                Moderator

                                                                  Your thoughts in the intro about barometer and WX struck a nerve.

                                                                  Yea it’s an important, but often overlooked part of preparedness.

                                                                  WX/satellite transmissions will require more work on my part.

                                                                  The cheap SDR Dongles can receive NOAA WX Satellite images.

                                                                  RTL-SDR Tutorial: Decoding Meteor-M2 Weather Satellite Images in Real-Time with an RTL-SDR

                                                                • #90468
                                                                  HiDesertRat
                                                                  Participant

                                                                    Thanks for the links/info. :good:

                                                                  • #90469
                                                                    trailman
                                                                    Participant

                                                                      came across this too from AMRRON

                                                                      http://www.broadcastify.com/listen/feed/20970/web

                                                                      Hurricane Watch Net – 14.3250 MHz and 7.2680 MHz – Live Audio Feed Web Player

                                                                    • #90470
                                                                      SeanT
                                                                      Keymaster

                                                                        7.2680 MHz will be lower side band
                                                                        14.3250 MHz will be upper side band

                                                                        for those who have shortwave receivers
                                                                        Max….here is your chance to test drive the Sony.

                                                                      • #90471
                                                                        Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                        Moderator

                                                                          Well another Tropical Storm threat, so a good reason to review this information!

                                                                        • #90472
                                                                          Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                          Moderator

                                                                            Always something to keep an eye on!

                                                                            WEEKEND: NEW HURRICANE SET FOR FLORIDA?

                                                                          • #90473
                                                                            Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                            Moderator

                                                                              Well as a friendly reminder and example with Hurricane Michael a possible threat.

                                                                              All I had to do was pick up a few projects that could go airborne with wind, fired up LP gas Generac, my gas generators, chainsaw, and topped off a couple of gas cans and vehicle.

                                                                              I do this monthly, but doesn’t hurt to double check. Even if I couldn’t get gas I have sufficient on hand, but topping off is part if my storm prep list.

                                                                              Took me longer to mow grass than get this done, got to keep things looking nice regardless of a hurricane. ;-)

                                                                              With current track I will only see some moderate wind and rain, but things can change quick.

                                                                            • #90474
                                                                              Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                              Moderator

                                                                                Took me longer to mow grass than get this done, got to keep things looking nice regardless of a hurricane.

                                                                                Though I take preparedness serious think about my above statement.

                                                                                Part of my hurricane preparations is making sure my lawn is freshly mowed! B-)

                                                                                While this is a threat, it isn’t the end of the world to me! ;-)

                                                                                Whether a direct catastrophic hit or a complete miss!

                                                                                Life goes on. :yes:

                                                                              • #90475
                                                                                wheelsee
                                                                                Participant

                                                                                  Took me longer to mow grass than get this done, got to keep things looking nice regardless of a hurricane.

                                                                                  Though I take preparedness serious think about my above statement.

                                                                                  Part of my hurricane preparations is making sure my lawn is freshly mowed! B-)

                                                                                  While this is a threat, it isn’t the end of the world to me! ;-)

                                                                                  Whether a direct catastrophic hit or a complete miss!

                                                                                  Life goes on. :yes:

                                                                                  Of course there is a strategy involved (for those who have never lived through a hurricane).

                                                                                  Mow now because it’s going to be too wet to do anything for a couple of weeks. Tall grass is a hiding place for snakes and rats – gators too if endemic. And it forces one to pickup small things that can/will blow around.

                                                                                • #90476
                                                                                  Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                  Moderator

                                                                                    That time of year again!

                                                                                    Of course there is more than Hurricane threats, but preparedness overlaps them all! ;-)

                                                                                  • #116938
                                                                                    Joe (G.W.N.S.)
                                                                                    Moderator

                                                                                      Threat bump! :good:

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