New 4 Day Combat Patrol: April 21-24

Video: Texas 2016 Overnight Patrol / Dawn Ambush
March 3, 2016
Helmets for FoF Team Tactics
March 3, 2016

The April Rifleman Challenge has been cancelled due to lack of bookings. The new policy on the RC will be to run it once a year, in September, and thus allow competitors the summer to train. Dates will be put up once the new schedule for the remainder of 2016 goes up, over the next week or so. My apologies to those already booked and deposits paid – separate email sent.

The Combat Patrol Class is going to a 4 day format. This will apply to those booked onto the July 14-16 CP, now July 13-16. Those already booked on that class will not have a price increase (it will stay at $600). The format of the 3 day Combat Patrol has already changed and it will now add a day at the beginning, for both CTT revision and greater depth to the class. The price going forward for the 4 day CP class (plus any new bookings) will be $650, so that means a discounted first day of training.

I am really excited about the new format for CP. I just ran it for the first time in Texas, as part of a 6 day CTT/CP class. The addition of a day up front will give the class greater depth, and allow revision of CTT, and added material, for those who may have had a gap since they attended CTT.

The cancelled RC will be replaced by  the new format Combat Patrol, April 21-24. The class price is discounted to $600 for 4 days of training. I understand that this is ‘short notice’ and thus I will take bookings slightly differently: please email me with your intent to take a place on the class, and I will add you to the roster. Once I reach class minimum, I will then request deposit/payment.

COMBAT PATROL PAGE HERE

Thank you.

Max

1 Comment

  1. shooter says:

    I don’t have anything to compare it to, but I will say that, from my perspective, the format for Combat Patrol in Texas was awesome!

    It all flowed together extremely well as a very realistic “operation”. Night recce, patrol movement with simplified hand signals, crossing a linear danger area, setting up security to eat chow, ambushing our back trail, setting up the patrol base, standing sentry every 3 hours through the night, and then moving out to the ambush site at 0400… I thought it was a great condensed version of what I would expect this stuff to be in the real world.

    Obviously, none of us left as “operators”, but I think we got enough exposure, explanation, and “lessons learned” to be a lot better at it next time.